Do government expenditures shift private philanthropic donations to particular fields of welfare? Evidence from cross-country data

Arjen de Wit, Michaela Neumayr, Femida Handy, Pamala Wiepking

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Do government expenditures shift private philanthropic donations to particular fields of welfare? We examine this association in the first cross-country study to correlate government expenditures with the level of individual private donations to different fields of welfare using the Individual International Philanthropy Database (IIPD, 2016; N country = 19; N individual = 126,923). The results of the descriptive and multilevel analyses support the idea of crosswise crowding-in; in countries where government expenditures in health and social protection are higher, more donors give to support the environment, international aid, and the arts. The level of giving to different sectors, however, is not associated with government expenditures. The results reject the crowding-out hypothesis and provide a nuanced picture of the relationship between government funding and philanthropic giving across different fields of social welfare.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-21
Number of pages16
JournalEuropean Sociological Review
Volume34
Issue number1
Early online date5 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

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donation
expenditures
welfare
evidence
crowding out
international aid
philanthropy
social welfare
funding
art
health

Cite this

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abstract = "Do government expenditures shift private philanthropic donations to particular fields of welfare? We examine this association in the first cross-country study to correlate government expenditures with the level of individual private donations to different fields of welfare using the Individual International Philanthropy Database (IIPD, 2016; N country = 19; N individual = 126,923). The results of the descriptive and multilevel analyses support the idea of crosswise crowding-in; in countries where government expenditures in health and social protection are higher, more donors give to support the environment, international aid, and the arts. The level of giving to different sectors, however, is not associated with government expenditures. The results reject the crowding-out hypothesis and provide a nuanced picture of the relationship between government funding and philanthropic giving across different fields of social welfare.",
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Do government expenditures shift private philanthropic donations to particular fields of welfare? Evidence from cross-country data. / de Wit, Arjen; Neumayr, Michaela; Handy, Femida; Wiepking, Pamala.

In: European Sociological Review, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 6-21.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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