Do individual differences in children’s curiosity relate to their inquiry-based learning?

Tessa JP van Schijndel, Brenda RJ Jansen, Maartje EJ Raijmakers

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study investigates how individual differences in 7- to 9-year-olds' curiosity relate to the inquiry-learning process and outcomes in environments differing in structure. The focus on curiosity as individual differences variable was motivated by the importance of curiosity in science education, and uncertainty being central to both the definition of curiosity and the inquiry-learning environment. Curiosity was assessed with the Underwater Exploration game (Jirout, J., & Klahr, D. (2012). Children's scientific curiosity: In search of an operational definition of an elusive concept. Developmental Review, 32, 125–160. doi:10.1016/j.dr.2012.04.002), and inquiry-based learning with the newly developed Scientific Discovery task, which focuses on the principle of designing informative experiments. Structure of the inquiry-learning environment was manipulated by explaining this principle or not. As intelligence relates to learning and possibly curiosity, it was taken into account. Results showed that children's curiosity was positively related to their knowledge acquisition, but not to their quality of exploration. For low intelligent children, environment structure positively affected their quality of exploration, but not their knowledge acquisition. There was no interaction between curiosity and environment structure. These results support the existence of two distinct inquiry-based learning processes – the designing of experiments, on the one hand, and the reflection on performed experiments, on the other – and link children's curiosity to the latter process.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)996-1015
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Science Education
Volume40
Issue number9
Early online date21 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

learning
knowledge acquisition
learning process
experiment
learning environment
intelligence
uncertainty
interaction
science
education

Cite this

@article{8db4a5d445e5483fb67725dde52baeac,
title = "Do individual differences in children’s curiosity relate to their inquiry-based learning?",
abstract = "This study investigates how individual differences in 7- to 9-year-olds' curiosity relate to the inquiry-learning process and outcomes in environments differing in structure. The focus on curiosity as individual differences variable was motivated by the importance of curiosity in science education, and uncertainty being central to both the definition of curiosity and the inquiry-learning environment. Curiosity was assessed with the Underwater Exploration game (Jirout, J., & Klahr, D. (2012). Children's scientific curiosity: In search of an operational definition of an elusive concept. Developmental Review, 32, 125–160. doi:10.1016/j.dr.2012.04.002), and inquiry-based learning with the newly developed Scientific Discovery task, which focuses on the principle of designing informative experiments. Structure of the inquiry-learning environment was manipulated by explaining this principle or not. As intelligence relates to learning and possibly curiosity, it was taken into account. Results showed that children's curiosity was positively related to their knowledge acquisition, but not to their quality of exploration. For low intelligent children, environment structure positively affected their quality of exploration, but not their knowledge acquisition. There was no interaction between curiosity and environment structure. These results support the existence of two distinct inquiry-based learning processes – the designing of experiments, on the one hand, and the reflection on performed experiments, on the other – and link children's curiosity to the latter process.",
author = "{van Schijndel}, {Tessa JP} and Jansen, {Brenda RJ} and Raijmakers, {Maartje EJ}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/09500693.2018.1460772",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "996--1015",
journal = "International Journal of Science Education",
issn = "0950-0693",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "9",

}

Do individual differences in children’s curiosity relate to their inquiry-based learning? / van Schijndel, Tessa JP; Jansen, Brenda RJ; Raijmakers, Maartje EJ.

In: International Journal of Science Education, Vol. 40, No. 9, 2018, p. 996-1015.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do individual differences in children’s curiosity relate to their inquiry-based learning?

AU - van Schijndel, Tessa JP

AU - Jansen, Brenda RJ

AU - Raijmakers, Maartje EJ

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - This study investigates how individual differences in 7- to 9-year-olds' curiosity relate to the inquiry-learning process and outcomes in environments differing in structure. The focus on curiosity as individual differences variable was motivated by the importance of curiosity in science education, and uncertainty being central to both the definition of curiosity and the inquiry-learning environment. Curiosity was assessed with the Underwater Exploration game (Jirout, J., & Klahr, D. (2012). Children's scientific curiosity: In search of an operational definition of an elusive concept. Developmental Review, 32, 125–160. doi:10.1016/j.dr.2012.04.002), and inquiry-based learning with the newly developed Scientific Discovery task, which focuses on the principle of designing informative experiments. Structure of the inquiry-learning environment was manipulated by explaining this principle or not. As intelligence relates to learning and possibly curiosity, it was taken into account. Results showed that children's curiosity was positively related to their knowledge acquisition, but not to their quality of exploration. For low intelligent children, environment structure positively affected their quality of exploration, but not their knowledge acquisition. There was no interaction between curiosity and environment structure. These results support the existence of two distinct inquiry-based learning processes – the designing of experiments, on the one hand, and the reflection on performed experiments, on the other – and link children's curiosity to the latter process.

AB - This study investigates how individual differences in 7- to 9-year-olds' curiosity relate to the inquiry-learning process and outcomes in environments differing in structure. The focus on curiosity as individual differences variable was motivated by the importance of curiosity in science education, and uncertainty being central to both the definition of curiosity and the inquiry-learning environment. Curiosity was assessed with the Underwater Exploration game (Jirout, J., & Klahr, D. (2012). Children's scientific curiosity: In search of an operational definition of an elusive concept. Developmental Review, 32, 125–160. doi:10.1016/j.dr.2012.04.002), and inquiry-based learning with the newly developed Scientific Discovery task, which focuses on the principle of designing informative experiments. Structure of the inquiry-learning environment was manipulated by explaining this principle or not. As intelligence relates to learning and possibly curiosity, it was taken into account. Results showed that children's curiosity was positively related to their knowledge acquisition, but not to their quality of exploration. For low intelligent children, environment structure positively affected their quality of exploration, but not their knowledge acquisition. There was no interaction between curiosity and environment structure. These results support the existence of two distinct inquiry-based learning processes – the designing of experiments, on the one hand, and the reflection on performed experiments, on the other – and link children's curiosity to the latter process.

U2 - 10.1080/09500693.2018.1460772

DO - 10.1080/09500693.2018.1460772

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 996

EP - 1015

JO - International Journal of Science Education

JF - International Journal of Science Education

SN - 0950-0693

IS - 9

ER -