Does coaching work? - A meta-analysis on the effects of coaching on individual level outcomes in an organizational context.

T. Theeboom, B. Beersma, A.E.M. van Vianen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Whereas coaching is very popular as a management tool, research on coaching effectiveness is lagging behind. Moreover, the studies on coaching that are currently available have focused on a large variety of processes and outcome measures and generally lack a firm theoretical foundation. With the meta-analysis presented in this article, we aim to shed light on the effectiveness of coaching within an organizational context. We address the question whether coaching has an effect on five both theoretically and practically relevant individual-level outcome categories: performance/skills, well-being, coping, work attitudes, and goal-directed self-regulation. The results show that coaching has significant positive effects on all outcomes with effect sizes ranging from g = 0.43 (coping) to g = 0.74 (goal-directed self-regulation). These findings indicate that coaching is, overall, an effective intervention in organizations. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

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Meta-Analysis
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Mentoring
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

Cite this

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title = "Does coaching work? - A meta-analysis on the effects of coaching on individual level outcomes in an organizational context.",
abstract = "Whereas coaching is very popular as a management tool, research on coaching effectiveness is lagging behind. Moreover, the studies on coaching that are currently available have focused on a large variety of processes and outcome measures and generally lack a firm theoretical foundation. With the meta-analysis presented in this article, we aim to shed light on the effectiveness of coaching within an organizational context. We address the question whether coaching has an effect on five both theoretically and practically relevant individual-level outcome categories: performance/skills, well-being, coping, work attitudes, and goal-directed self-regulation. The results show that coaching has significant positive effects on all outcomes with effect sizes ranging from g = 0.43 (coping) to g = 0.74 (goal-directed self-regulation). These findings indicate that coaching is, overall, an effective intervention in organizations. {\circledC} 2013 {\circledC} 2013 Taylor & Francis.",
author = "T. Theeboom and B. Beersma and {van Vianen}, A.E.M.",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/17439760.2013.837499",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "1--18",
journal = "The Journal of Positive Psychology: Dedicated to Furthering Research and Promoting Good Practice",
issn = "1743-9760",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Does coaching work? - A meta-analysis on the effects of coaching on individual level outcomes in an organizational context.

AU - Theeboom,T.

AU - Beersma,B.

AU - van Vianen,A.E.M.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Whereas coaching is very popular as a management tool, research on coaching effectiveness is lagging behind. Moreover, the studies on coaching that are currently available have focused on a large variety of processes and outcome measures and generally lack a firm theoretical foundation. With the meta-analysis presented in this article, we aim to shed light on the effectiveness of coaching within an organizational context. We address the question whether coaching has an effect on five both theoretically and practically relevant individual-level outcome categories: performance/skills, well-being, coping, work attitudes, and goal-directed self-regulation. The results show that coaching has significant positive effects on all outcomes with effect sizes ranging from g = 0.43 (coping) to g = 0.74 (goal-directed self-regulation). These findings indicate that coaching is, overall, an effective intervention in organizations. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

AB - Whereas coaching is very popular as a management tool, research on coaching effectiveness is lagging behind. Moreover, the studies on coaching that are currently available have focused on a large variety of processes and outcome measures and generally lack a firm theoretical foundation. With the meta-analysis presented in this article, we aim to shed light on the effectiveness of coaching within an organizational context. We address the question whether coaching has an effect on five both theoretically and practically relevant individual-level outcome categories: performance/skills, well-being, coping, work attitudes, and goal-directed self-regulation. The results show that coaching has significant positive effects on all outcomes with effect sizes ranging from g = 0.43 (coping) to g = 0.74 (goal-directed self-regulation). These findings indicate that coaching is, overall, an effective intervention in organizations. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

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JO - The Journal of Positive Psychology: Dedicated to Furthering Research and Promoting Good Practice

T2 - The Journal of Positive Psychology: Dedicated to Furthering Research and Promoting Good Practice

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