Does who decides really matter? Causes and consequences of personal financial management in the case of larger and structural charitable donations

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We study causes and consequences of financial management in households in the specific case of charitable giving. We test hypotheses using couples in the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (n = 1,101). We find that more relationship specific investments lead to deciding on charitable giving as one economic actor. Furthermore, we find that the partner with the highest relative educational resources has most decision making power over charitable donations. Separately deciding couples are smallest charitable donors. Households in which the male partner decides are largest charitable donors when only larger and more structural donations are considered. This can be explained by their more conservative religious denomination. © 2010 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)240-263
JournalVoluntas
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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financial management
donation
cause
denomination
Netherlands
decision making
resources
economics
Financial management
Charitable donations
Charitable giving
Household
Panel study
Donation
Education
Hypothesis test
Denomination
Decision making
Resources
The Netherlands

Cite this

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title = "Does who decides really matter? Causes and consequences of personal financial management in the case of larger and structural charitable donations",
abstract = "We study causes and consequences of financial management in households in the specific case of charitable giving. We test hypotheses using couples in the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (n = 1,101). We find that more relationship specific investments lead to deciding on charitable giving as one economic actor. Furthermore, we find that the partner with the highest relative educational resources has most decision making power over charitable donations. Separately deciding couples are smallest charitable donors. Households in which the male partner decides are largest charitable donors when only larger and more structural donations are considered. This can be explained by their more conservative religious denomination. {\circledC} 2010 The Author(s).",
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Does who decides really matter? Causes and consequences of personal financial management in the case of larger and structural charitable donations. / Wiepking, P.; Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

In: Voluntas, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2010, p. 240-263.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - We study causes and consequences of financial management in households in the specific case of charitable giving. We test hypotheses using couples in the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (n = 1,101). We find that more relationship specific investments lead to deciding on charitable giving as one economic actor. Furthermore, we find that the partner with the highest relative educational resources has most decision making power over charitable donations. Separately deciding couples are smallest charitable donors. Households in which the male partner decides are largest charitable donors when only larger and more structural donations are considered. This can be explained by their more conservative religious denomination. © 2010 The Author(s).

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