Dupin v. France: the ECtHR going old school in its appraisal of inclusive education?

J. Lievens, Marie Spinoy

Research output: Online publication or Non-textual formOnline publication or WebsiteAcademic

Abstract

In Dupin v. France the European Court of Human Rights saw itself confronted with one of the key conflicts in education law: when parents and state officials disagree on which educational trajectory is best for a child with a disability, who gets the final say? This case concerned a mother fighting the decision of the French authorities to refuse her child, who has Autism Spectrum Disorder, access to a general school (through a form of inclusive education). Instead, the child was referred to an ‘Institut medico-éducatif’, an institution established to provide care and a specialized type of education to children with an intellectual impairment. Seemingly going back on its prior case law, the Court did not consider the right to education of the child to be violated.
Original languageEnglish
Media of outputOnline
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2019

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France
school
education
autism
case law
parents
human rights
disability
Law

Cite this

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title = "Dupin v. France: the ECtHR going old school in its appraisal of inclusive education?",
abstract = "In Dupin v. France the European Court of Human Rights saw itself confronted with one of the key conflicts in education law: when parents and state officials disagree on which educational trajectory is best for a child with a disability, who gets the final say? This case concerned a mother fighting the decision of the French authorities to refuse her child, who has Autism Spectrum Disorder, access to a general school (through a form of inclusive education). Instead, the child was referred to an ‘Institut medico-{\'e}ducatif’, an institution established to provide care and a specialized type of education to children with an intellectual impairment. Seemingly going back on its prior case law, the Court did not consider the right to education of the child to be violated.",
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Dupin v. France: the ECtHR going old school in its appraisal of inclusive education? Lievens, J. (Author); Spinoy, Marie (Author). 2019.

Research output: Online publication or Non-textual formOnline publication or WebsiteAcademic

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