Early-Onset Severe Encephalopathy with Epilepsy: The BRAT1 Gene Should Be Added to the List of Causes

L.A. van de Pol, N.I. Wolf, M.M. van Weissenbruch, C.J. Stam, M.M. Weiss, Q. Waisfisz, S.H. Kevelam, M. Bugiani, J.M. van de Kamp, M. Knaap

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    A variety of pathologies can underlie early-onset severe encephalopathy with epilepsy. To aid the diagnostic process in such patients we present an overview of causes, including the rapidly expanding list of genes involved. When no explanation is found, whole-exome sequencing (WES) can be used in an attempt to identify gene defects in patients suspected to suffer from a genetic form. We describe three siblings, born to consanguineous parents, with a lethal severe epileptic encephalopathy with early-infantile onset, including their magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography and, in one case, neuropathological findings. Using WES a homozygous frameshift mutation in the BRAT1 gene, c.638dup p.(Val214Glyfs∗189), was identified. We present our cases in the context of all published cases with mutations in the BRAT1 gene and conclude that BRAT1 should be added to the growing list of genes related to early-onset severe encephalopathy with epilepsy.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)392-400
    JournalNeuropediatrics
    Volume46
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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