Ecologically friendly sourcing in developing countries: a non-food case study

S.L.J.M. de Leeuw, Wout Dullaert, Abderrahim Ouaderzan

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how nearby sourcing versus long-distance sourcing affects the ecological friendliness—operationalized in terms of energy efficiency—of a supply chain for a non-food item in a developing country. Using case research, we show that the average energy needed to supply a pair of imported shoes to a retailer in Morocco is less than the average energy needed to supply a pair of locally produced shoes. These findings highlight the need to assess the true total energy effects of nearby sourcing versus long-distance sourcing since the outcomes of such assessments may be more complicated than they appear upon first glance, particularly in developing countries.
Original languageEnglish
Article number6
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalLogistics
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Aug 2017

Keywords

  • energy consumption
  • supply chains in emerging markets
  • developing countries
  • sustainable supply chains

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