Economy-Wide estimates of the implications of climate change: Human health

F. Bosello, R. Roson, R.S.J. Tol

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We study the economic impacts of climate-change-induced change in human health, viz. cardiovascular and respiratory disorders, diarrhoea, malaria, dengue fever and schistosomiasis. Changes in morbidity and mortality are interpreted as changes in labour productivity and demand for health care, and used to shock the GTAP-E computable general equilibrium model, calibrated for the year 2050. GDP, welfare and investment fall (rise) in regions with net negative (positive) health impacts. Prices, production, and terms of trade show a mixed pattern. Direct cost estimates, common in climate change impact studies, underestimate the true welfare losses. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)579-591
Number of pages13
JournalEcological Economics
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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dengue fever
schistosomiasis
terms of trade
computable general equilibrium analysis
labor productivity
climate change
malaria
health impact
morbidity
Gross Domestic Product
economic impact
health care
mortality
cost
economy
human health
Climate change
Human health
price
loss

Cite this

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title = "Economy-Wide estimates of the implications of climate change: Human health",
abstract = "We study the economic impacts of climate-change-induced change in human health, viz. cardiovascular and respiratory disorders, diarrhoea, malaria, dengue fever and schistosomiasis. Changes in morbidity and mortality are interpreted as changes in labour productivity and demand for health care, and used to shock the GTAP-E computable general equilibrium model, calibrated for the year 2050. GDP, welfare and investment fall (rise) in regions with net negative (positive) health impacts. Prices, production, and terms of trade show a mixed pattern. Direct cost estimates, common in climate change impact studies, underestimate the true welfare losses. {\circledC} 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
author = "F. Bosello and R. Roson and R.S.J. Tol",
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Economy-Wide estimates of the implications of climate change: Human health. / Bosello, F.; Roson, R.; Tol, R.S.J.

In: Ecological Economics, Vol. 58, 2006, p. 579-591.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Economy-Wide estimates of the implications of climate change: Human health

AU - Bosello, F.

AU - Roson, R.

AU - Tol, R.S.J.

PY - 2006

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N2 - We study the economic impacts of climate-change-induced change in human health, viz. cardiovascular and respiratory disorders, diarrhoea, malaria, dengue fever and schistosomiasis. Changes in morbidity and mortality are interpreted as changes in labour productivity and demand for health care, and used to shock the GTAP-E computable general equilibrium model, calibrated for the year 2050. GDP, welfare and investment fall (rise) in regions with net negative (positive) health impacts. Prices, production, and terms of trade show a mixed pattern. Direct cost estimates, common in climate change impact studies, underestimate the true welfare losses. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - We study the economic impacts of climate-change-induced change in human health, viz. cardiovascular and respiratory disorders, diarrhoea, malaria, dengue fever and schistosomiasis. Changes in morbidity and mortality are interpreted as changes in labour productivity and demand for health care, and used to shock the GTAP-E computable general equilibrium model, calibrated for the year 2050. GDP, welfare and investment fall (rise) in regions with net negative (positive) health impacts. Prices, production, and terms of trade show a mixed pattern. Direct cost estimates, common in climate change impact studies, underestimate the true welfare losses. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2005.07.032

DO - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2005.07.032

M3 - Article

VL - 58

SP - 579

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JF - Ecological Economics

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