Effective Macroprudential Policy: Cross-Sector Substitution from Price and Quantity Measures

Janko Cizel, Jon Frost, Aerdt Houben, Peter Wierts

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Macroprudential policy is increasingly being implemented worldwide, and is mostly applied to banks. A key question is whether this prompts substitution toward nonbank credit. Using two different global data sets on macroprudential measures and different methodologies, including detrended series, panel estimations, and propensity score matching, we find evidence of such substitution. Substitution toward nonbank credit appears to be stronger when policy measures are binding and are implemented in economies with well-developed nonbank credit markets. This substitution partially offsets the fall in bank credit, thus dampening the policies’ effect on total credit.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1209-1235
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Money, Credit and Banking
Volume51
Issue number5
Early online date27 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Substitution
Credit
Policy measures
Propensity score matching
Panel estimation
Methodology
Credit markets
Bank credit

Keywords

  • (shadow) banking
  • E58
  • financial cycle
  • financial supervision
  • G10
  • G18
  • G20
  • G58
  • macroprudential regulation

Cite this

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title = "Effective Macroprudential Policy: Cross-Sector Substitution from Price and Quantity Measures",
abstract = "Macroprudential policy is increasingly being implemented worldwide, and is mostly applied to banks. A key question is whether this prompts substitution toward nonbank credit. Using two different global data sets on macroprudential measures and different methodologies, including detrended series, panel estimations, and propensity score matching, we find evidence of such substitution. Substitution toward nonbank credit appears to be stronger when policy measures are binding and are implemented in economies with well-developed nonbank credit markets. This substitution partially offsets the fall in bank credit, thus dampening the policies’ effect on total credit.",
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Effective Macroprudential Policy : Cross-Sector Substitution from Price and Quantity Measures. / Cizel, Janko; Frost, Jon; Houben, Aerdt; Wierts, Peter.

In: Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Vol. 51, No. 5, 08.2019, p. 1209-1235.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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KW - (shadow) banking

KW - E58

KW - financial cycle

KW - financial supervision

KW - G10

KW - G18

KW - G20

KW - G58

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