Effectiveness and feasibility of eccentric and task-oriented strength training in individuals with stroke

Mireille A. Folkerts*, Juha M. Hijmans, Anne L. Elsinghorst, Yvon Mulderij, Alessio Murgia, Rienk Dekker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Strength training can increase function in individuals with stroke. However it is unclear which type of strength training is most effective and feasible. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect and feasibility of an intervention combining eccentric and task-oriented strength training in individuals with chronic stroke. METHODS: Eleven participants were randomly assigned to a group first receiving four weeks of eccentric strength training and then four weeks of task-oriented strength training (EST-TOST) or vice versa (TOST-EST). Strength and upper limb function were administered with a hand-held dynamometer (HHD) and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) respectively. Feasibility was evaluated with the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI), the adherence and drop-out rate. RESULTS: Significant increases were found in ARAT score (mean difference 7.3; p<0.05) and in shoulder and elbow strength (mean difference respectively 23.96N; p<0.001 and 27.41N; p<0.003). Participants rated both EST and TOST with 81 on the IMI, the adherence rate was high and there was one drop-out. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that a combination of eccentric and task-oriented strength training is an effective and feasible training method to increase function and strength in individuals with chronic stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-471
Number of pages13
JournalNeuroRehabilitation
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • eccentric
  • effectiveness
  • feasibility
  • strength training
  • Stroke
  • task-oriented

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