Effects of Cranial Electrostimulation on the rest-activity rhythm and salivary cortisol in patients with probable Alzheimers's disease.

E.J.A. Scherder, D.L. Knol, E.J.W. van Someren, J.B. Deijen, R. Binnenkade, F.J.H. Tilders

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

76 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective. In previous studies, cranial electrostimulation (CES) had positive effects on sleep in depressed patients and in patients with vascular dementia. The present study examined the effects of low-frequency CES on the rest-activity rhythm and cortisol levels of patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Method. It was hypothesised that a decreased level of cortisol would parallel a positive effect of low-frequency CES on nocturnal restlessness. Sixteen AD patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 8) or a control group (n = 8). The experimental group was treated with CES, whereas the control group received sham stimulation, for 30 minutes a day, during 6 weeks. The rest-activity rhythm was assessed by actigraphy. Cortisol was measured repeatedly in the saliva throughout the day by means of salivette tubes. Results. Low-frequency CES did not improve the rest-activity rhythm in AD patients. Moreover, both groups showed an increase instead of a decrease in the level of cortisol. Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that low-frequency CES has no positive effect on the rest-activity rhythm in AD patients. An alternative research design with high-frequency CES in AD is discussed. © 2003, SAGE Publications. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-108
Number of pages9
JournalNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of Cranial Electrostimulation on the rest-activity rhythm and salivary cortisol in patients with probable Alzheimers's disease.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this