Efficacy and acceptability of psychological interventions for social anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

L. Yang, X. Zhou, J. Pu, L. Liu, P. Cuijpers, Y. Zhang, H. Zhang, S. Yuan, T. Teng, L. Tian, P. Xie

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent and persistent in children and adolescents. However, evidence for the efficacy and acceptability of psychological interventions for SAD in children and adolescents remains unclear. Seven electronic databases (PubMed, CENTRAL, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and ProQuest) were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared psychological interventions for SAD with control conditions in children and adolescents were included. Primary outcomes were the efficacy (mean change in anxiety symptom scores) and acceptability (dropouts for all reasons). Secondary outcomes were remission, quality of life/functional improvement, and depressive symptoms measures. Seventeen RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. Psychological interventions (including cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral therapy) were significantly more effective than control conditions, with a standardized mean difference (SMD) of − 1.13, and remission with a risk ratio (RR) of 8.99, the number needed to treat was 3.3. There was no statistically significant difference between psychological interventions and control conditions for all-cause dropouts (RR = 1.00). Psychological interventions were superior to control conditions in improving quality of life/functioning (SMD = 0.79) and reducing depressive symptoms (SMD = − 0.39). Given considerable heterogeneity of primary efficacy outcome, a series of subgroup analyses of different variables were conducted. Psychological interventions are probably efficacious in the treatment of SAD among children and adolescents, and may markedly improve quality of life and functioning in this population. However, this finding should be interpreted with caution because of the high heterogeneity of trials and low literature quality. Keywords Child · Adolescent · Psychological intervention · Meta-analysis · Social anxiety disorder
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-89
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume28
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Psychology
Quality of Life
Odds Ratio
Depression
Numbers Needed To Treat
Cognitive Therapy
Social Phobia
PubMed
Anxiety
Databases
Therapeutics
Population

Cite this

Yang, L. ; Zhou, X. ; Pu, J. ; Liu, L. ; Cuijpers, P. ; Zhang, Y. ; Zhang, H. ; Yuan, S. ; Teng, T. ; Tian, L. ; Xie, P. / Efficacy and acceptability of psychological interventions for social anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 79-89.
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abstract = "Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent and persistent in children and adolescents. However, evidence for the efficacy and acceptability of psychological interventions for SAD in children and adolescents remains unclear. Seven electronic databases (PubMed, CENTRAL, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and ProQuest) were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared psychological interventions for SAD with control conditions in children and adolescents were included. Primary outcomes were the efficacy (mean change in anxiety symptom scores) and acceptability (dropouts for all reasons). Secondary outcomes were remission, quality of life/functional improvement, and depressive symptoms measures. Seventeen RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. Psychological interventions (including cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral therapy) were significantly more effective than control conditions, with a standardized mean difference (SMD) of − 1.13, and remission with a risk ratio (RR) of 8.99, the number needed to treat was 3.3. There was no statistically significant difference between psychological interventions and control conditions for all-cause dropouts (RR = 1.00). Psychological interventions were superior to control conditions in improving quality of life/functioning (SMD = 0.79) and reducing depressive symptoms (SMD = − 0.39). Given considerable heterogeneity of primary efficacy outcome, a series of subgroup analyses of different variables were conducted. Psychological interventions are probably efficacious in the treatment of SAD among children and adolescents, and may markedly improve quality of life and functioning in this population. However, this finding should be interpreted with caution because of the high heterogeneity of trials and low literature quality. Keywords Child · Adolescent · Psychological intervention · Meta-analysis · Social anxiety disorder",
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Efficacy and acceptability of psychological interventions for social anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. / Yang, L.; Zhou, X.; Pu, J.; Liu, L.; Cuijpers, P.; Zhang, Y. ; Zhang, H.; Yuan, S.; Teng, T.; Tian, L.; Xie, P.

In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 28, No. 1, 2019, p. 79-89.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Efficacy and acceptability of psychological interventions for social anxiety disorder in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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AU - Liu, L.

AU - Cuijpers, P.

AU - Zhang, Y.

AU - Zhang, H.

AU - Yuan, S.

AU - Teng, T.

AU - Tian, L.

AU - Xie, P.

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N2 - Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent and persistent in children and adolescents. However, evidence for the efficacy and acceptability of psychological interventions for SAD in children and adolescents remains unclear. Seven electronic databases (PubMed, CENTRAL, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and ProQuest) were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared psychological interventions for SAD with control conditions in children and adolescents were included. Primary outcomes were the efficacy (mean change in anxiety symptom scores) and acceptability (dropouts for all reasons). Secondary outcomes were remission, quality of life/functional improvement, and depressive symptoms measures. Seventeen RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. Psychological interventions (including cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral therapy) were significantly more effective than control conditions, with a standardized mean difference (SMD) of − 1.13, and remission with a risk ratio (RR) of 8.99, the number needed to treat was 3.3. There was no statistically significant difference between psychological interventions and control conditions for all-cause dropouts (RR = 1.00). Psychological interventions were superior to control conditions in improving quality of life/functioning (SMD = 0.79) and reducing depressive symptoms (SMD = − 0.39). Given considerable heterogeneity of primary efficacy outcome, a series of subgroup analyses of different variables were conducted. Psychological interventions are probably efficacious in the treatment of SAD among children and adolescents, and may markedly improve quality of life and functioning in this population. However, this finding should be interpreted with caution because of the high heterogeneity of trials and low literature quality. Keywords Child · Adolescent · Psychological intervention · Meta-analysis · Social anxiety disorder

AB - Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent and persistent in children and adolescents. However, evidence for the efficacy and acceptability of psychological interventions for SAD in children and adolescents remains unclear. Seven electronic databases (PubMed, CENTRAL, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and ProQuest) were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared psychological interventions for SAD with control conditions in children and adolescents were included. Primary outcomes were the efficacy (mean change in anxiety symptom scores) and acceptability (dropouts for all reasons). Secondary outcomes were remission, quality of life/functional improvement, and depressive symptoms measures. Seventeen RCTs were included in this meta-analysis. Psychological interventions (including cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral therapy) were significantly more effective than control conditions, with a standardized mean difference (SMD) of − 1.13, and remission with a risk ratio (RR) of 8.99, the number needed to treat was 3.3. There was no statistically significant difference between psychological interventions and control conditions for all-cause dropouts (RR = 1.00). Psychological interventions were superior to control conditions in improving quality of life/functioning (SMD = 0.79) and reducing depressive symptoms (SMD = − 0.39). Given considerable heterogeneity of primary efficacy outcome, a series of subgroup analyses of different variables were conducted. Psychological interventions are probably efficacious in the treatment of SAD among children and adolescents, and may markedly improve quality of life and functioning in this population. However, this finding should be interpreted with caution because of the high heterogeneity of trials and low literature quality. Keywords Child · Adolescent · Psychological intervention · Meta-analysis · Social anxiety disorder

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