Employment and crime: A longitudinal follow-up of organized crime offenders

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Abstract

Employment is considered to help offenders desist from crime. Studies focusing on organized crime offenders, however, have suggested that employment may promote rather than inhibit crime for these offenders, but lacked quantitative individual-level data to confirm this finding. Using a large sample of organized crime offenders (N = 1921) and longitudinal individual data on offending, employment, income and financial support, the current study aims to clarify the role of employment in the offending careers of these offenders. Fixed effects models show the effects of employment, self-employment and employment on the payroll. For organized crime offenders, being employed is associated with a 10 percent increase in offending and having their own business is associated with a 23 percent increase in offending. For organized crime offenders in leadership positions, employment is associated with a 47 percent increase in offending and owning a business is associated with a 68 percent increase in offending.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1097-1121
JournalEuropean Journal of Criminology
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jul 2020

Funding

The data used in this article are part of a continuing research project, the Dutch Organized Crime Monitor, combined with information from the Dutch Judicial Documentation System and Statistics Netherlands. We are grateful to all past and present members of the Dutch Organized Crime Monitor research group, in particular Ruud Kouwenberg, Christianne de Poot, Robby Roks, and Henk van de Bunt, for their efforts. Furthermore, we would like to thank the members of the Recidivism Monitor team of the Research and Documentation Centre (WODC), in particular Gijs Weijters, Daphne Blokdijk, Ad Essers and Nikolaj Tollenaar, and our contact persons at Statistics Netherlands for their data deliveries and helpful support of this study. The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This contribution received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement Nr. 699824 (project PROTON). The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This contribution received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement Nr. 699824 (project PROTON).

FundersFunder number
Henk van de Bunt
Horizon 2020 Framework Programme699824

    Keywords

    • Organized crime
    • employment
    • offending careers

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