Energy cost of balance control during walking decreases with external stabilizer stiffness independent of walking speed

T. Ijmker, J.H.P. Houdijk, C.J.C. Lamoth, P.J. Beek, L.H.V. van der Woude

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Human walking requires active neuromuscular control to ensure stability in the lateral direction, which inflicts a certain metabolic load. The magnitude of this metabolic load has previously been investigated by means of passive external lateral stabilization via spring-like cords. In the present study, we applied this method to test two hypotheses: (1) the effect of external stabilization on energy cost depends on the stiffness of the stabilizing springs, and (2) the energy cost for balance control, and consequently the effect of external stabilization on energy cost, depends on walking speed. Fourteen healthy young adults walked on a motor driven treadmill without stabilization and with stabilization with four different spring stiffnesses (between 760 and 1820Nm
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2109-2114
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of Biomechanics
    Volume46
    Issue number13
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    Cost Control
    Walking
    Stabilization
    Stiffness
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    Costs
    Young Adult
    Exercise equipment
    Walking Speed
    Direction compound

    Cite this

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    title = "Energy cost of balance control during walking decreases with external stabilizer stiffness independent of walking speed",
    abstract = "Human walking requires active neuromuscular control to ensure stability in the lateral direction, which inflicts a certain metabolic load. The magnitude of this metabolic load has previously been investigated by means of passive external lateral stabilization via spring-like cords. In the present study, we applied this method to test two hypotheses: (1) the effect of external stabilization on energy cost depends on the stiffness of the stabilizing springs, and (2) the energy cost for balance control, and consequently the effect of external stabilization on energy cost, depends on walking speed. Fourteen healthy young adults walked on a motor driven treadmill without stabilization and with stabilization with four different spring stiffnesses (between 760 and 1820Nm",
    author = "T. Ijmker and J.H.P. Houdijk and C.J.C. Lamoth and P.J. Beek and {van der Woude}, L.H.V.",
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    Energy cost of balance control during walking decreases with external stabilizer stiffness independent of walking speed. / Ijmker, T.; Houdijk, J.H.P.; Lamoth, C.J.C.; Beek, P.J.; van der Woude, L.H.V.

    In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 46, No. 13, 2013, p. 2109-2114.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Energy cost of balance control during walking decreases with external stabilizer stiffness independent of walking speed

    AU - Ijmker, T.

    AU - Houdijk, J.H.P.

    AU - Lamoth, C.J.C.

    AU - Beek, P.J.

    AU - van der Woude, L.H.V.

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - Human walking requires active neuromuscular control to ensure stability in the lateral direction, which inflicts a certain metabolic load. The magnitude of this metabolic load has previously been investigated by means of passive external lateral stabilization via spring-like cords. In the present study, we applied this method to test two hypotheses: (1) the effect of external stabilization on energy cost depends on the stiffness of the stabilizing springs, and (2) the energy cost for balance control, and consequently the effect of external stabilization on energy cost, depends on walking speed. Fourteen healthy young adults walked on a motor driven treadmill without stabilization and with stabilization with four different spring stiffnesses (between 760 and 1820Nm

    AB - Human walking requires active neuromuscular control to ensure stability in the lateral direction, which inflicts a certain metabolic load. The magnitude of this metabolic load has previously been investigated by means of passive external lateral stabilization via spring-like cords. In the present study, we applied this method to test two hypotheses: (1) the effect of external stabilization on energy cost depends on the stiffness of the stabilizing springs, and (2) the energy cost for balance control, and consequently the effect of external stabilization on energy cost, depends on walking speed. Fourteen healthy young adults walked on a motor driven treadmill without stabilization and with stabilization with four different spring stiffnesses (between 760 and 1820Nm

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    DO - 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2013.07.005

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    JO - Journal of Biomechanics

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