Enhancement of large-scale flood risk assessments using building-material-based vulnerability curves for an object-based approach in urban and rural areas

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Abstract

In this study, we developed an enhanced approach for large-scale flood damage and risk assessments that uses characteristics of buildings and the built environment as object-based information to represent exposure and vulnerability to flooding. Most current large-scale assessments use an aggregated land-use category to represent the exposure, treating all exposed elements the same. For large areas where previously only coarse information existed such as in Africa, more detailed exposure data are becoming available. For our approach, a direct relation between the construction type and building material of the exposed elements is used to develop vulnerability curves. We further present a method to differentiate flood risk in urban and rural areas based on characteristics of the built environment. We applied the model to Ethiopia and found that rural flood risk accounts for about 22% of simulated damage; rural damage is generally neglected in the typical land-use-based damage models, particularly at this scale. Our approach is particularly interesting for studies in areas where there is a large variation in construction types in the building stock, such as developing countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1703-1722
Number of pages20
JournalNatural Hazards and Earth System Sciences
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2019

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rural area
vulnerability
risk assessment
urban area
damage
land use
flood damage
flooding
developing world
exposure
built environment
method
Africa
damage assessment

Cite this

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title = "Enhancement of large-scale flood risk assessments using building-material-based vulnerability curves for an object-based approach in urban and rural areas",
abstract = "In this study, we developed an enhanced approach for large-scale flood damage and risk assessments that uses characteristics of buildings and the built environment as object-based information to represent exposure and vulnerability to flooding. Most current large-scale assessments use an aggregated land-use category to represent the exposure, treating all exposed elements the same. For large areas where previously only coarse information existed such as in Africa, more detailed exposure data are becoming available. For our approach, a direct relation between the construction type and building material of the exposed elements is used to develop vulnerability curves. We further present a method to differentiate flood risk in urban and rural areas based on characteristics of the built environment. We applied the model to Ethiopia and found that rural flood risk accounts for about 22{\%} of simulated damage; rural damage is generally neglected in the typical land-use-based damage models, particularly at this scale. Our approach is particularly interesting for studies in areas where there is a large variation in construction types in the building stock, such as developing countries.",
author = "Johanna Englhardt and {de Moel}, Hans and Huyck, {Charles K.} and {de Ruiter}, Marleen and J.C.J.H. Aerts and Philip Ward",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "12",
doi = "10.5194/nhess-19-1703-2019",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "1703--1722",
journal = "Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences",
issn = "1561-8633",
publisher = "European Geosciences Union",
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T1 - Enhancement of large-scale flood risk assessments using building-material-based vulnerability curves for an object-based approach in urban and rural areas

AU - Englhardt, Johanna

AU - de Moel, Hans

AU - Huyck, Charles K.

AU - de Ruiter, Marleen

AU - Aerts, J.C.J.H.

AU - Ward, Philip

PY - 2019/8/12

Y1 - 2019/8/12

N2 - In this study, we developed an enhanced approach for large-scale flood damage and risk assessments that uses characteristics of buildings and the built environment as object-based information to represent exposure and vulnerability to flooding. Most current large-scale assessments use an aggregated land-use category to represent the exposure, treating all exposed elements the same. For large areas where previously only coarse information existed such as in Africa, more detailed exposure data are becoming available. For our approach, a direct relation between the construction type and building material of the exposed elements is used to develop vulnerability curves. We further present a method to differentiate flood risk in urban and rural areas based on characteristics of the built environment. We applied the model to Ethiopia and found that rural flood risk accounts for about 22% of simulated damage; rural damage is generally neglected in the typical land-use-based damage models, particularly at this scale. Our approach is particularly interesting for studies in areas where there is a large variation in construction types in the building stock, such as developing countries.

AB - In this study, we developed an enhanced approach for large-scale flood damage and risk assessments that uses characteristics of buildings and the built environment as object-based information to represent exposure and vulnerability to flooding. Most current large-scale assessments use an aggregated land-use category to represent the exposure, treating all exposed elements the same. For large areas where previously only coarse information existed such as in Africa, more detailed exposure data are becoming available. For our approach, a direct relation between the construction type and building material of the exposed elements is used to develop vulnerability curves. We further present a method to differentiate flood risk in urban and rural areas based on characteristics of the built environment. We applied the model to Ethiopia and found that rural flood risk accounts for about 22% of simulated damage; rural damage is generally neglected in the typical land-use-based damage models, particularly at this scale. Our approach is particularly interesting for studies in areas where there is a large variation in construction types in the building stock, such as developing countries.

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