Evoking and Measuring Arousal in Game Settings

J. Cusveller, C. Gerritsen, J. de Man

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Serious games seem to be more effective if the participant feels more involved in the game. The participant should experience a high sense of presence which can be obtained by matching the level of excitement to the level of arousal a participant experiences. The level of arousal should be measured at runtime to make the game adaptive to the participant's physiological state. In this paper an experiment is presented that has as main goal to see whether it is possible to evoke arousal during different types of computer games and to monitor the physiological response. Using three online games, participants reported different levels of stress and understanding between games. Furthermore, an increase of skin conductance was found as well as a decrease in heart rate for the most difficult to understand game. © 2014 Springer International Publishing.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationGames for Training, Education, Health and Sports
EditorsS. Gobel, J. Wiemeyer
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages165-174
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventGamedays 2014 -
Duration: 1 Jan 20141 Jan 2014

Conference

ConferenceGamedays 2014
Period1/01/141/01/14

Fingerprint

Computer games
Skin
Experiments
Serious games

Cite this

Cusveller, J., Gerritsen, C., & de Man, J. (2014). Evoking and Measuring Arousal in Game Settings. In S. Gobel, & J. Wiemeyer (Eds.), Games for Training, Education, Health and Sports (pp. 165-174). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05972-3_17
Cusveller, J. ; Gerritsen, C. ; de Man, J. / Evoking and Measuring Arousal in Game Settings. Games for Training, Education, Health and Sports. editor / S. Gobel ; J. Wiemeyer. Springer International Publishing, 2014. pp. 165-174
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Cusveller, J, Gerritsen, C & de Man, J 2014, Evoking and Measuring Arousal in Game Settings. in S Gobel & J Wiemeyer (eds), Games for Training, Education, Health and Sports. Springer International Publishing, pp. 165-174, Gamedays 2014, 1/01/14. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05972-3_17

Evoking and Measuring Arousal in Game Settings. / Cusveller, J.; Gerritsen, C.; de Man, J.

Games for Training, Education, Health and Sports. ed. / S. Gobel; J. Wiemeyer. Springer International Publishing, 2014. p. 165-174.

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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Cusveller J, Gerritsen C, de Man J. Evoking and Measuring Arousal in Game Settings. In Gobel S, Wiemeyer J, editors, Games for Training, Education, Health and Sports. Springer International Publishing. 2014. p. 165-174 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-05972-3_17