Examining the hostile media effect as an intergroup phenomenon: The role of ingroup identification and status

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This approach conceptualizes the hostile media effect (HME) as an intergroup phenomenon. Two empirical studies, one quasi-experimental and one experimental, examine the HME in the context of the abortion debate. Both studies show that ingroup identification and group status qualify the HME. Pro-choice and pro-life group members perceived an identical newspaper article as biased against their own viewpoint only if they considered their ingroup to have a lower status in society than the outgroup. In addition, only group members with a stronger ingroup identification showed a HME, particularly because of self-investment components of ingroup identification. Taken together, the findings confirm the important influence of ingroup status and ingroup identification on the HME. © 2013 International Communication Association.
Original languageEnglish
Article number7
Pages (from-to)535-555
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Communication
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Communication
group membership
international communication
status group
outgroup
abortion
newspaper
Media Effects
Society

Cite this

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title = "Examining the hostile media effect as an intergroup phenomenon: The role of ingroup identification and status",
abstract = "This approach conceptualizes the hostile media effect (HME) as an intergroup phenomenon. Two empirical studies, one quasi-experimental and one experimental, examine the HME in the context of the abortion debate. Both studies show that ingroup identification and group status qualify the HME. Pro-choice and pro-life group members perceived an identical newspaper article as biased against their own viewpoint only if they considered their ingroup to have a lower status in society than the outgroup. In addition, only group members with a stronger ingroup identification showed a HME, particularly because of self-investment components of ingroup identification. Taken together, the findings confirm the important influence of ingroup status and ingroup identification on the HME. {\circledC} 2013 International Communication Association.",
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Examining the hostile media effect as an intergroup phenomenon: The role of ingroup identification and status. / Hartmann, T.; Tanis, M.A.

In: Journal of Communication, Vol. 63, No. 3, 7, 2013, p. 535-555.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - This approach conceptualizes the hostile media effect (HME) as an intergroup phenomenon. Two empirical studies, one quasi-experimental and one experimental, examine the HME in the context of the abortion debate. Both studies show that ingroup identification and group status qualify the HME. Pro-choice and pro-life group members perceived an identical newspaper article as biased against their own viewpoint only if they considered their ingroup to have a lower status in society than the outgroup. In addition, only group members with a stronger ingroup identification showed a HME, particularly because of self-investment components of ingroup identification. Taken together, the findings confirm the important influence of ingroup status and ingroup identification on the HME. © 2013 International Communication Association.

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