Exploring dimensions of sharing economy business models enabled by IS: An Australian study

Ella Hafermalz, Sebastian Boell, Steve Elliot, Dirk Hovorka, Olivera Marjanovic

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Over the last decade, the Sharing Economy has developed rapidly to become a significant source of market disruption. However, multi-disciplinary research into the phenomenon is constrained by uncertainties about its focus, scope and even what activities the term “Sharing Economy” refers to. This paper’s research aims are to address those constraints by clarifying concepts and terminology to afford meaningful discourse and impactful research. We do this by developing a Sharing Economy Diagnostic (ShED) for categorising companies and organizations who participate in platform-based sharing that is enabled by Information Systems. Within the Australian Sharing Economy, Information Systems occupy the sweet spot, being located at the intersection of demand for different types of market behaviours and enabling those demands by bringing market groups together in ways that are facilitating and creating new business models.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 27th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, ACIS 2016
PublisherUniversity of Wollongong, Faculty of Business
ISBN (Electronic)9781741282672
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes
Event27th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, ACIS 2016 - Wollongong, Australia
Duration: 5 Dec 20167 Dec 2016

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 27th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, ACIS 2016

Conference

Conference27th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, ACIS 2016
CountryAustralia
CityWollongong
Period5/12/167/12/16

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Business model
  • IS transformation
  • Platform
  • Sharing economy

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