Faces capture attention: Evidence from Inhibition-of-return

J. Theeuwes, S. van der Stigchel

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The human face is a visual pattern of great social and biological importance. While previous studies have shown that attention may be preferentially directed and engaged longer by faces, the current study presents a new methodology to test the notion that faces can capture attention. The present study uses the occurrence of inhibition of return (IOR) as a diagnostic tool to determine the allocation of attention in visual space. Because previous research suggested that IOR at a location in space only occurs after attention has been reflexively moved to that location, the current finding of IOR at the location of the face provides converging support for the claim that faces do have the ability to summon attention. © 2006 Psychology Press Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)657-665
Number of pages10
JournalVisual Cognition
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Aptitude
Psychology
Inhibition (Psychology)
Attention Capture
Inhibition of Return
Research
Human Face
Methodology
Diagnostics
Visual Space

Cite this

Theeuwes, J. ; van der Stigchel, S. / Faces capture attention: Evidence from Inhibition-of-return. In: Visual Cognition. 2006 ; Vol. 13, No. 6. pp. 657-665.
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Faces capture attention: Evidence from Inhibition-of-return. / Theeuwes, J.; van der Stigchel, S.

In: Visual Cognition, Vol. 13, No. 6, 2006, p. 657-665.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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