Family Functioning and Children’s Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in a Referred Sample Exposed to Interparental Violence

M.D. Telman, M.M. Overbeek, J.C. de Schipper, F. Lamers-Winkelman, C. Finkenauer, C. Schuengel

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the association between interparental violence (IPV), child abuse and neglect, other traumatic experiences, and children’s post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and explored the moderating role of family functioning in the aftermath of IPV. One hundred and twenty IPV-exposed children (53.3 % male, M age = 9.85) and parents who were referred to community mental health centers participated in the study. Combined, IPV, child abuse and neglect, and other traumatic experiences were associated with PTS symptoms. For family functioning, higher levels of parenting stress were associated with higher levels of PTS symptoms. No moderating effects were found. To understand the variability in PTS symptoms among children exposed to IPV, other traumatic and stressful experiences need to be taken into account.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-136
JournalJournal of Family Violence
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Violence
Child Abuse
violence
neglect
abuse
Community Mental Health Centers
experience
Parenting
parents
Parents
mental health
community

Cite this

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Family Functioning and Children’s Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in a Referred Sample Exposed to Interparental Violence. / Telman, M.D.; Overbeek, M.M.; de Schipper, J.C.; Lamers-Winkelman, F.; Finkenauer, C.; Schuengel, C.

In: Journal of Family Violence, Vol. 31, No. 1, 2016, p. 127-136.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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