Filamentary keratopathy as a chronic problem in the long-term care of patients in a vegetative state

J. Lavrijsen, G.H.M.B. van Rens, H. van den Bosch

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Purpose: To emphasize that filamentary keratopathy may occur in the long-term care of patients in a vegetative state. Methods: Clinical observation of 2 young patients who had survived 16 and 81/2 years, respectively, in a vegetative state after an acute traumatic brain accident. Interventions were analyzed against the background of the different speculations about the relationship between filamentary keratopathy and the vegetative state. Results: Both patients' medical records registered 36 and 24 episodes of "a red eye," respectively, which in most cases were due to filamentary keratopathy. The episodes lasted 1-51/2 months, despite lubrication, removal of filaments, and regular application of corticoid ointment. The longest remission occurred when the eyes were frequently opened, and no topical medications were applied. This experience supports the hypothesis that prolonged eyelid closure is more likely related to filamentary keratopathy in these patients, more so than a moistening disturbance. Conclusions: Filamentary keratopathy can be a chronic problem in the long-term course of a patient in a vegetative state with remissions and exacerbations. These cases substantiate a relationship, although the precise mechanism is speculative. The incidence and effective treatment await further reports. Copyright © 2005 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)620-2
    JournalCornea
    Volume24
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

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    Persistent Vegetative State
    Long-Term Care
    Lubrication
    Eyelids
    Ointments
    Accidents
    Medical Records
    Adrenal Cortex Hormones
    Observation
    Incidence
    Brain

    Cite this

    Lavrijsen, J. ; van Rens, G.H.M.B. ; van den Bosch, H. / Filamentary keratopathy as a chronic problem in the long-term care of patients in a vegetative state. In: Cornea. 2005 ; Vol. 24. pp. 620-2.
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    title = "Filamentary keratopathy as a chronic problem in the long-term care of patients in a vegetative state",
    abstract = "Purpose: To emphasize that filamentary keratopathy may occur in the long-term care of patients in a vegetative state. Methods: Clinical observation of 2 young patients who had survived 16 and 81/2 years, respectively, in a vegetative state after an acute traumatic brain accident. Interventions were analyzed against the background of the different speculations about the relationship between filamentary keratopathy and the vegetative state. Results: Both patients' medical records registered 36 and 24 episodes of {"}a red eye,{"} respectively, which in most cases were due to filamentary keratopathy. The episodes lasted 1-51/2 months, despite lubrication, removal of filaments, and regular application of corticoid ointment. The longest remission occurred when the eyes were frequently opened, and no topical medications were applied. This experience supports the hypothesis that prolonged eyelid closure is more likely related to filamentary keratopathy in these patients, more so than a moistening disturbance. Conclusions: Filamentary keratopathy can be a chronic problem in the long-term course of a patient in a vegetative state with remissions and exacerbations. These cases substantiate a relationship, although the precise mechanism is speculative. The incidence and effective treatment await further reports. Copyright {\circledC} 2005 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.",
    author = "J. Lavrijsen and {van Rens}, G.H.M.B. and {van den Bosch}, H.",
    year = "2005",
    doi = "10.1097/01.ico.0000151502.19071.58",
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    Filamentary keratopathy as a chronic problem in the long-term care of patients in a vegetative state. / Lavrijsen, J.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.; van den Bosch, H.

    In: Cornea, Vol. 24, 2005, p. 620-2.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    AU - van den Bosch, H.

    PY - 2005

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    N2 - Purpose: To emphasize that filamentary keratopathy may occur in the long-term care of patients in a vegetative state. Methods: Clinical observation of 2 young patients who had survived 16 and 81/2 years, respectively, in a vegetative state after an acute traumatic brain accident. Interventions were analyzed against the background of the different speculations about the relationship between filamentary keratopathy and the vegetative state. Results: Both patients' medical records registered 36 and 24 episodes of "a red eye," respectively, which in most cases were due to filamentary keratopathy. The episodes lasted 1-51/2 months, despite lubrication, removal of filaments, and regular application of corticoid ointment. The longest remission occurred when the eyes were frequently opened, and no topical medications were applied. This experience supports the hypothesis that prolonged eyelid closure is more likely related to filamentary keratopathy in these patients, more so than a moistening disturbance. Conclusions: Filamentary keratopathy can be a chronic problem in the long-term course of a patient in a vegetative state with remissions and exacerbations. These cases substantiate a relationship, although the precise mechanism is speculative. The incidence and effective treatment await further reports. Copyright © 2005 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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