Generalized or Origin-Specific Out-Group Prejudice?: The Role of Temporary and Chronic Pathogen-Avoidance Motivation in Intergroup Relations

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Researchers have proposed that intergroup prejudice is partially caused by behavioral immune system mechanisms. Across four studies (total N = 1,849), we used both experimental (pathogen priming) and individual differences (pathogen disgust sensitivity [PDS]) approaches to test whether the behavioral immune system influences prejudice toward immigrants indiscriminately (the generalized out-group prejudice hypothesis) or specifically toward immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology (the origin-specific out-group prejudice hypothesis). Internal meta-analyses lend some support to both hypotheses. At the experimental level, pathogen primes had no effect on attitudes toward origin-unspecified immigrants or immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology. At the individual differences level, PDS has a unique negative effect on comfort with immigrants from pathogen-rich ecologies but not on comfort with immigrants from unspecified ecologies. However, pathogen disgust sensitivity was negatively related to the decision to allow entry to both origin-unspecified immigrants and immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1-14
Number of pages14
JournalEvolutionary Psychology
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Motivation
Ecology
Individuality
Immune System
Meta-Analysis
Research Personnel

Bibliographical note

First published online: February 10, 2019

Keywords

  • behavioral immune system
  • immigrants
  • internal meta-analyses
  • out-group prejudice
  • pathogen disgust sensitivity

Cite this

@article{a6894cb871604645a27ada101563d036,
title = "Generalized or Origin-Specific Out-Group Prejudice?: The Role of Temporary and Chronic Pathogen-Avoidance Motivation in Intergroup Relations",
abstract = "Researchers have proposed that intergroup prejudice is partially caused by behavioral immune system mechanisms. Across four studies (total N = 1,849), we used both experimental (pathogen priming) and individual differences (pathogen disgust sensitivity [PDS]) approaches to test whether the behavioral immune system influences prejudice toward immigrants indiscriminately (the generalized out-group prejudice hypothesis) or specifically toward immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology (the origin-specific out-group prejudice hypothesis). Internal meta-analyses lend some support to both hypotheses. At the experimental level, pathogen primes had no effect on attitudes toward origin-unspecified immigrants or immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology. At the individual differences level, PDS has a unique negative effect on comfort with immigrants from pathogen-rich ecologies but not on comfort with immigrants from unspecified ecologies. However, pathogen disgust sensitivity was negatively related to the decision to allow entry to both origin-unspecified immigrants and immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology.",
keywords = "behavioral immune system, immigrants, internal meta-analyses, out-group prejudice, pathogen disgust sensitivity",
author = "Tingting Ji and Tybur, {Joshua M.} and {van Vugt}, Mark",
note = "First published online: February 10, 2019",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1474704919826851",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "1--14",
journal = "Evolutionary Psychology: An International Journal of Evolutionary Approaches to Psychology and Behavior",
issn = "1474-7049",
publisher = "Human Nature Review",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Generalized or Origin-Specific Out-Group Prejudice?

T2 - Evolutionary Psychology: An International Journal of Evolutionary Approaches to Psychology and Behavior

AU - Ji, Tingting

AU - Tybur, Joshua M.

AU - van Vugt, Mark

N1 - First published online: February 10, 2019

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Researchers have proposed that intergroup prejudice is partially caused by behavioral immune system mechanisms. Across four studies (total N = 1,849), we used both experimental (pathogen priming) and individual differences (pathogen disgust sensitivity [PDS]) approaches to test whether the behavioral immune system influences prejudice toward immigrants indiscriminately (the generalized out-group prejudice hypothesis) or specifically toward immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology (the origin-specific out-group prejudice hypothesis). Internal meta-analyses lend some support to both hypotheses. At the experimental level, pathogen primes had no effect on attitudes toward origin-unspecified immigrants or immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology. At the individual differences level, PDS has a unique negative effect on comfort with immigrants from pathogen-rich ecologies but not on comfort with immigrants from unspecified ecologies. However, pathogen disgust sensitivity was negatively related to the decision to allow entry to both origin-unspecified immigrants and immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology.

AB - Researchers have proposed that intergroup prejudice is partially caused by behavioral immune system mechanisms. Across four studies (total N = 1,849), we used both experimental (pathogen priming) and individual differences (pathogen disgust sensitivity [PDS]) approaches to test whether the behavioral immune system influences prejudice toward immigrants indiscriminately (the generalized out-group prejudice hypothesis) or specifically toward immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology (the origin-specific out-group prejudice hypothesis). Internal meta-analyses lend some support to both hypotheses. At the experimental level, pathogen primes had no effect on attitudes toward origin-unspecified immigrants or immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology. At the individual differences level, PDS has a unique negative effect on comfort with immigrants from pathogen-rich ecologies but not on comfort with immigrants from unspecified ecologies. However, pathogen disgust sensitivity was negatively related to the decision to allow entry to both origin-unspecified immigrants and immigrants from a pathogen-rich ecology.

KW - behavioral immune system

KW - immigrants

KW - internal meta-analyses

KW - out-group prejudice

KW - pathogen disgust sensitivity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061287313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061287313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1474704919826851

DO - 10.1177/1474704919826851

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 1

EP - 14

JO - Evolutionary Psychology: An International Journal of Evolutionary Approaches to Psychology and Behavior

JF - Evolutionary Psychology: An International Journal of Evolutionary Approaches to Psychology and Behavior

SN - 1474-7049

IS - 1

ER -