Genetic influences on disordered eating behaviour are largely independent of body mass index.

M.C.T. Slof-Op 't Landt, M. Bartels, E.F. van Furth, C.E.M. van Beijsterveldt, I. Meulenbelt, P.E. Slagboom, D.I. Boomsma

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Abstract

Objective: Prior studies suggest eating disorders and related characteristics are moderately to substantially heritable. We are interested in identifying the genes underlying disordered eating behaviour (DEB), and want to know how much of the genetic influence underlying DEB is attributable to genetic influences on body mass index (BMI). Method: Bivariate analyses were performed, in adolescent twins and siblings, to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions for DEB, BMI, and their overlap. Results: Shared genetic risk factors explained the overlap between BMI and DEB (genetic correlation was 0.43 in women, 0.51 in men). DEB was highly heritable in women (a
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)348-356
JournalActa psychiatrica scandinavica
Volume117
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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