Genome-Wide Association Uncovers Shared Genetic Effects Among Personality Traits and Mood States

M. Luciano, J.E. Huffman, A. Arias-Vasquez, A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen, C.M. Middeldorp, I. Giegling, A. Payton, G.E. Davies, L. Zgaga, J.G. Janzing, X.Y. Ke, T. Galesloot, A. M. Hartmann, W. Ollier, A. Tenesa, C. Hayward, M. Verhagen, G.W. Montgomery, J.J. Hottenga, B. KonteJ.M. Starr, V. Vitart, P.E. Vos, P.A.F. Madden, G. Willemsen, H. Konnerth, M.A. Horan, D.J. Porteous, H. Campbell, S.H. Vermeulen, A.C. Heath, A. Wright, O. Polasek, S.B. Kovacevic, N. Hastie, B. Franke, D.I. Boomsma, N.G. Martin, D. Rujescu, J.F. Wilson, J. Buitelaar, N. Pendleton, I. Rudan, I.J. Deary

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Measures of personality and psychological distress are correlated and exhibit genetic covariance. We conducted univariate genome-wide SNP (∼2.5 million) and gene-based association analyses of these traits and examined the overlap in results across traits, including a prediction analysis of mood states using genetic polygenic scores for personality. Measures of neuroticism, extraversion, and symptoms of anxiety, depression, and general psychological distress were collected in eight European cohorts (n ranged 546-1,338; maximum total n=6,268) whose mean age ranged from 55 to 79 years. Meta-analysis of the cohort results was performed, with follow-up associations of the top SNPs and genes investigated in independent cohorts (n=527-6,032). Suggestive association (P=8×10
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)684-695
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Volume159B
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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