Getting in shape: Reconstructing three-dimensional long-track speed skating kinematics by comparing several body pose reconstruction techniques

E. van der Kruk*, A. L. Schwab, F.C.T. van der Helm, H. E.J. Veeger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In gait studies body pose reconstruction (BPR) techniques have been widely explored, but no previous protocols have been developed for speed skating, while the peculiarities of the skating posture and technique do not automatically allow for the transfer of the results of those explorations to kinematic skating data. The aim of this paper is to determine the best procedure for body pose reconstruction and inverse dynamics of speed skating, and to what extend this choice influences the estimation of joint power. The results show that an eight body segment model together with a global optimization method with revolute joint in the knee and in the lumbosacral joint, while keeping the other joints spherical, would be the most realistic model to use for the inverse kinematics in speed skating. To determine joint power, this method should be combined with a least-square error method for the inverse dynamics. Reporting on the BPR technique and the inverse dynamic method is crucial to enable comparison between studies. Our data showed an underestimation of up to 74% in mean joint power when no optimization procedure was applied for BPR and an underestimation of up to 31% in mean joint power when a bottom-up inverse dynamics method was chosen instead of a least square error approach. Although these results are aimed at speed skating, reporting on the BPR procedure and the inverse dynamics method, together with setting a golden standard should be common practice in all human movement research to allow comparison between studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-112
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume69
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Body pose reconstruction
  • Inverse dynamics
  • Joint power
  • Motion capture
  • Speed skating

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