Glenohumeral contact forces and muscle forces evaluated in wheelchair-related activities of daily living in able-bodied subjects versus subjects with paraplegia and tetraplegia

S. van Drongelen, L.H.V. van der Woude, T.W.J. Janssen, E.D.L. Angenot, E.K.J. Chadwick, H.E.J. Veeger

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    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the differences in glenohumeral contact forces and shoulder muscle forces between able-bodied subjects and subjects with paraplegia and tetraplegia during wheelchair-related activities of daily living (ADLs).

    DESIGN: Kinematics and external forces were measured during wheelchair ADLs (level propulsion, weight-relief lifting, reaching) and processed by using an inverse dynamics 3-dimensional biomechanical model.

    SETTING: Biomechanics laboratory.

    PARTICIPANTS: Five able-bodied subjects, 8 subjects with paraplegia, and 4 subjects with tetraplegia (N = 17).

    INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Glenohumeral contact forces and shoulder muscle forces.

    RESULTS: Peak contact forces were significantly higher for weight-relief lifting compared with reaching and level propulsion (P < .001). High relative muscle force of the rotator cuff was seen, apparently needed to stabilize the joint. For weight-relief lifting, total relative muscle force was significantly higher for the tetraplegia group than for the able-bodied group (P = .022).

    CONCLUSIONS: Glenohumeral contact forces were significantly higher for weight-relief lifting and highest over the 3 tasks for the tetraplegia group. Without taking paralysis into account, more muscle force was estimated for the subjects with tetraplegia during weight-relief lifting.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1434-40
    Number of pages7
    JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Volume86
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2005

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