Global aspirations, regional variation? Explaining the global uptake and growth of forestry certification

Hendrik Z.Adriaan van der Loos*, Agni Kalfagianni, Frank Biermann

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Private governance, in the form of certification schemes, has grown remarkably in the past decades as a response to some of the most pressing environmental and social challenges. Certification schemes denote steering mechanisms that allow enterprises to voluntarily adhere to a set of verifiable principles. While certification has global aspirations, its uptake and growth are heterogeneous across different countries. Yet, few studies empirically analyze such variation. We address this gap by focusing on the Forest Stewardship Council, a major sustainable forestry management certification program. We empirically evaluate uptake and growth across 151 countries and hypothesize that market and socio-political characteristics explain variation in uptake and growth. We find that a value-added wood industry, state-control of the forestry industry and competing certification programs, contrary to the literature, are key drivers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-50
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Forest Economics
Volume33
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Certification
  • Forest Stewardship Council
  • Private regulation
  • Sustainable forestry management
  • Uptake

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