Global fisheries governance beyond the state: unraveling the effectiveness of the Marine Stewardship Council.

A. Kalfagianni, P.H. Pattberg

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Marine ecosystems are increasingly under pressure. Despite commitments by governments and intergovernmental organizations, such as the 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement and the 1995 Food and Agriculture Organisation Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries Practices, the depletion of marine resources has intensified over the past 40 years. In this context, a number of non-state market-based governance schemes have emerged that attempt to mitigate the ongoing marine crisis through certifying sustainable fisheries. In this article, we investigate the effects of one of the most prominent private organizations in global fisheries governance, the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). Specifically, we evaluate the role of the MSC in addressing the worldwide decline in fish stocks and examine broader political and socio-economic effects that are often associated with the emergence and implementation of private rules and standards. With this analysis, we aim to unravel the conditions under which the MSC can contribute to more sustainable and equitable fisheries management at regional and global levels. © 2013 AESS.
LanguageEnglish
Pages184-193
JournalJournal of Environmental Studies and Sciences
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

fishery
governance
marine resource
United Nations
fishery management
marine ecosystem
agriculture
UNO
market
food
commitment
management
resources
economics
fish stock
effect
socioeconomics
analysis
code

Cite this

@article{0d2f10e682d441798d692268b77155b9,
title = "Global fisheries governance beyond the state: unraveling the effectiveness of the Marine Stewardship Council.",
abstract = "Marine ecosystems are increasingly under pressure. Despite commitments by governments and intergovernmental organizations, such as the 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement and the 1995 Food and Agriculture Organisation Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries Practices, the depletion of marine resources has intensified over the past 40 years. In this context, a number of non-state market-based governance schemes have emerged that attempt to mitigate the ongoing marine crisis through certifying sustainable fisheries. In this article, we investigate the effects of one of the most prominent private organizations in global fisheries governance, the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). Specifically, we evaluate the role of the MSC in addressing the worldwide decline in fish stocks and examine broader political and socio-economic effects that are often associated with the emergence and implementation of private rules and standards. With this analysis, we aim to unravel the conditions under which the MSC can contribute to more sustainable and equitable fisheries management at regional and global levels. {\circledC} 2013 AESS.",
author = "A. Kalfagianni and P.H. Pattberg",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1007/s13412-013-0118-z",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "184--193",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences",
issn = "2190-6483",
publisher = "Springer Publishing Company",
number = "2",

}

Global fisheries governance beyond the state: unraveling the effectiveness of the Marine Stewardship Council. / Kalfagianni, A.; Pattberg, P.H.

In: Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, Vol. 3, No. 2, 2013, p. 184-193.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Global fisheries governance beyond the state: unraveling the effectiveness of the Marine Stewardship Council.

AU - Kalfagianni, A.

AU - Pattberg, P.H.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Marine ecosystems are increasingly under pressure. Despite commitments by governments and intergovernmental organizations, such as the 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement and the 1995 Food and Agriculture Organisation Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries Practices, the depletion of marine resources has intensified over the past 40 years. In this context, a number of non-state market-based governance schemes have emerged that attempt to mitigate the ongoing marine crisis through certifying sustainable fisheries. In this article, we investigate the effects of one of the most prominent private organizations in global fisheries governance, the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). Specifically, we evaluate the role of the MSC in addressing the worldwide decline in fish stocks and examine broader political and socio-economic effects that are often associated with the emergence and implementation of private rules and standards. With this analysis, we aim to unravel the conditions under which the MSC can contribute to more sustainable and equitable fisheries management at regional and global levels. © 2013 AESS.

AB - Marine ecosystems are increasingly under pressure. Despite commitments by governments and intergovernmental organizations, such as the 1995 United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement and the 1995 Food and Agriculture Organisation Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries Practices, the depletion of marine resources has intensified over the past 40 years. In this context, a number of non-state market-based governance schemes have emerged that attempt to mitigate the ongoing marine crisis through certifying sustainable fisheries. In this article, we investigate the effects of one of the most prominent private organizations in global fisheries governance, the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). Specifically, we evaluate the role of the MSC in addressing the worldwide decline in fish stocks and examine broader political and socio-economic effects that are often associated with the emergence and implementation of private rules and standards. With this analysis, we aim to unravel the conditions under which the MSC can contribute to more sustainable and equitable fisheries management at regional and global levels. © 2013 AESS.

U2 - 10.1007/s13412-013-0118-z

DO - 10.1007/s13412-013-0118-z

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 184

EP - 193

JO - Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences

T2 - Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences

JF - Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences

SN - 2190-6483

IS - 2

ER -