Happily (mal)adjusted: Cosmopolitan identity and expatriate adjustment

A. Grinstein, L. Wathieu

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

As an increasing portion of the world's population identifies itself as cosmopolitan, we examine whether cosmopolitan identity involves openness and adaptability to new environments or instead favors maintaining a global lifestyle that persists across environments. Based on a field study of expatriates, we find that the expected duration of sojourn is a crucial moderator of cosmopolitan behavior. In short-duration sojourns, cosmopolitans adjust more to new environments than non-cosmopolitans. In long-duration sojourns, non-cosmopolitans adjust more to the host country while cosmopolitans tend to retreat into a global lifestyle. We find that these adjustment choices are correlated with well-being, contrary to the claims in existing literature on expatriates that adjustment should be the preferred behavior regardless of consumer identity. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-345
JournalInternational Journal of Research in Marketing
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Expatriate adjustment
Lifestyle
Field study
Host country
Openness
Well-being
Moderator
Expatriates
Adaptability

Cite this

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Happily (mal)adjusted: Cosmopolitan identity and expatriate adjustment. / Grinstein, A.; Wathieu, L.

In: International Journal of Research in Marketing, Vol. 29, No. 4, 2012, p. 337-345.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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