Has migration been beneficial for migrants and their children?

C.V. Zuccotti, H.B.G. Ganzeboom, A. Güveli

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The study compares the social mobility and status attainment of first- and second-generation Turks in nine Western European countries with those of Western European natives and with those of Turks in Turkey. It shows that the children of low-class migrants are more likely to acquire a higher education than their counterparts in Turkey, making them more educationally mobile. Moreover, they successfully convert this education in the Western European labor market, and are upwardly mobile relative to the first generation. When comparing labor market outcomes of second generations relative to Turks in Turkey, however, the results show that the same level of education leads to a higher occupation in Turkey. The implications of these findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97–126
JournalInternational Migration Review
Volume51
Issue number1
Early online date3 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Turk
Turkey
migrant
migration
first generation
labor market
European market
lower class
Social Mobility
level of education
social status
education
occupation
Migrants
Turks
Labour Market

Cite this

Zuccotti, C.V. ; Ganzeboom, H.B.G. ; Güveli, A. / Has migration been beneficial for migrants and their children?. In: International Migration Review. 2017 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 97–126.
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Has migration been beneficial for migrants and their children? / Zuccotti, C.V.; Ganzeboom, H.B.G.; Güveli, A.

In: International Migration Review, Vol. 51, No. 1, 2017, p. 97–126.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - The study compares the social mobility and status attainment of first- and second-generation Turks in nine Western European countries with those of Western European natives and with those of Turks in Turkey. It shows that the children of low-class migrants are more likely to acquire a higher education than their counterparts in Turkey, making them more educationally mobile. Moreover, they successfully convert this education in the Western European labor market, and are upwardly mobile relative to the first generation. When comparing labor market outcomes of second generations relative to Turks in Turkey, however, the results show that the same level of education leads to a higher occupation in Turkey. The implications of these findings are discussed.

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