High HDL cholesterol does not protect against coronary artery disease when associated with combined cholesteryl ester transfer protein and hepatic lipase gene variants

Bernadette A C van Acker, Gert-Jan Botma, Aeilko H Zwinderman, Jan Albert Kuivenhoven, Geesje M Dallinga-Thie, Eric J G Sijbrands, Jolanda M A Boer, Jacob C Seidell, J Wouter Jukema, John J P Kastelein, Hans Jansen, Adrie J M Verhoeven, REGRESS Study Group

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and hepatic lipase (HL) are two HDL modifying proteins that have both pro- and anti-atherogenic properties. We hypothesized that CETP and HL synergistically affect HDL cholesterol and atherosclerotic risk. To test our hypothesis, we analysed the genotype frequencies of CETP Taq1B (rs708272) and LIPC-514C/T (rs1800588) polymorphisms in male coronary artery disease patients (CAD; n=792) and non-symptomatic controls (n=539). Cases and controls had similar allele frequencies, but the occurrence of the combined genotypes differed (p=0.027). In CAD patients, 1.3% had the CETP-B2B2/LIPC-TT genotype, with only 0.2% in controls (p=0.033). The presence of the CETP lowering B2 allele and the HL lowering LIPC-T allele synergistically increased HDL cholesterol from 0.87+/-0.19 mmol/L in the B1B1/CC (n=183) to 1.21+/-0.25 mmol/L in the B2B2/TT carriers (n=10). The B1B1/CC carriers had an increased CAD risk (OR 1.4; p=0.025). Despite their high HDL cholesterol, the B2B2/TT individuals also had an increased CAD risk (OR 3.7; p=0.033). In a 2-year follow up, the loss of coronary artery lumen diameter in these patients was higher than in all other patients combined (0.34+/-0.70 versus 0.10+/-0.29 mm; p=0.044). We conclude that a high HDL cholesterol does not protect against coronary artery disease when associated with combined CETP- and HL-lowering gene variants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-167
Number of pages7
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume200
Issue number1
Early online date3 Jan 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2008

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Cholesterol Ester Transfer Proteins
  • Cholesterol, HDL
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Genetic Predisposition to Disease
  • Homozygote
  • Humans
  • Lipase
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Odds Ratio
  • Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
  • Journal Article
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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