How do activating interventions fit the personal needs, characteristics and preferences of people with dementia living in the community and their informal caregivers?

Netta Van’t Leven*, Jacomine de Lange, Anna Eva Prick, Anne Margriet Pot

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Psychosocial interventions aim to mitigate the serious consequences of dementia for the daily life of people with dementia and their informal caregivers. To deliver a person-centred approach, it is crucial to take needs, characteristics and preferences of people with dementia and their informal caregivers into account. However, these factors are generally not systematically checked in order to determine which intervention will be most appropriate. Additionally, little is known about which intervention suits which needs, characteristics and preferences. Therefore, this study examined how three multiple-component, activating dyadic interventions fitted needs, characteristics, and preferences of both the people with dementia and their informal caregivers: the Pleasant Events Program, the Exercise and Support Intervention for People with Dementia and Their Caregivers, and Occupational Therapy. Semi-structured interviews were held with participants in either one of the interventions, 34 dyads and 19 professionals. The constant comparative method was used for the analysis. Five factors influenced the dyad’s ‘fit’: timing, need for activity, lifestyle, apart-or-together and meaning of (lost) activity. The factors ‘timing’ and a ‘need for activity’ were conditional for these activating interventions. Dyads in an early stage of dementia, who were aware of the effects on daily life, were open to a change in routine, and had a need to maintain activities profited from these interventions. Three distinctive factors were important for the fit of one of the three interventions in particular: ‘lifestyle’, ‘apart or together’ and ‘meaning of (lost) activity’. The Pleasant Events Programme and the Exercise and Support intervention properly addressed the need for activities that afforded daily pastimes or structure. The Exercise and Support Intervention addressed the need for physical activity and emphasized shared activity. Occupational Therapy properly addressed the need for self-sufficiency, maintaining activities and adjustment to physical limitations. These factors can contribute to a more person-centred application of the interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-177
Number of pages21
JournalDementia
Volume18
Issue number1
Early online date10 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • caregivers
  • dementia
  • intervention
  • person-centred care
  • qualitative research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How do activating interventions fit the personal needs, characteristics and preferences of people with dementia living in the community and their informal caregivers?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this