How Does Protesting Work in the Age of Social Media?

Research output: Online publication or Non-textual formOnline publication or WebsiteAcademic

Abstract

The recognizable hashtags #BlackLivesMatter, #RefugeesWelcome and #BringBackOurGirls offer just a few examples of how online platforms are increasingly used to accelerate the growth of political and social movements. In recent years, social media has changed the way in which activists are able to organize themselves, promote their message and mobilize support globally for physical demonstrations. However, while social media has an obvious role in raising the profile of particular issues, are online tools such as petitions and hashtags more effective than traditional methods in affecting real change and impacting policy outcomes? Or are those involved simply ‘clicktivists’ who show no more commitment than pressing a button? Professor Jacquelien van Stekelenburg argues that while online networks have increased political participation, by allowing participants to frame their ideas through interactions with allies and opponents, physical protests remain vital to achieving change in the age of social media. During the discussion, she outlines how online and offline campaigns can be effectively combined to deliver maximum political impact.
LanguageEnglish
StatePublished - 24 Jan 2018

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title = "How Does Protesting Work in the Age of Social Media?",
abstract = "The recognizable hashtags #BlackLivesMatter, #RefugeesWelcome and #BringBackOurGirls offer just a few examples of how online platforms are increasingly used to accelerate the growth of political and social movements. In recent years, social media has changed the way in which activists are able to organize themselves, promote their message and mobilize support globally for physical demonstrations. However, while social media has an obvious role in raising the profile of particular issues, are online tools such as petitions and hashtags more effective than traditional methods in affecting real change and impacting policy outcomes? Or are those involved simply ‘clicktivists’ who show no more commitment than pressing a button? Professor Jacquelien van Stekelenburg argues that while online networks have increased political participation, by allowing participants to frame their ideas through interactions with allies and opponents, physical protests remain vital to achieving change in the age of social media. During the discussion, she outlines how online and offline campaigns can be effectively combined to deliver maximum political impact.",
author = "{van Stekelenburg}, Jacquelien",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "24",
language = "English",

}

How Does Protesting Work in the Age of Social Media?. van Stekelenburg, Jacquelien (Author). 2018.

Research output: Online publication or Non-textual formOnline publication or WebsiteAcademic

TY - ADVS

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N2 - The recognizable hashtags #BlackLivesMatter, #RefugeesWelcome and #BringBackOurGirls offer just a few examples of how online platforms are increasingly used to accelerate the growth of political and social movements. In recent years, social media has changed the way in which activists are able to organize themselves, promote their message and mobilize support globally for physical demonstrations. However, while social media has an obvious role in raising the profile of particular issues, are online tools such as petitions and hashtags more effective than traditional methods in affecting real change and impacting policy outcomes? Or are those involved simply ‘clicktivists’ who show no more commitment than pressing a button? Professor Jacquelien van Stekelenburg argues that while online networks have increased political participation, by allowing participants to frame their ideas through interactions with allies and opponents, physical protests remain vital to achieving change in the age of social media. During the discussion, she outlines how online and offline campaigns can be effectively combined to deliver maximum political impact.

AB - The recognizable hashtags #BlackLivesMatter, #RefugeesWelcome and #BringBackOurGirls offer just a few examples of how online platforms are increasingly used to accelerate the growth of political and social movements. In recent years, social media has changed the way in which activists are able to organize themselves, promote their message and mobilize support globally for physical demonstrations. However, while social media has an obvious role in raising the profile of particular issues, are online tools such as petitions and hashtags more effective than traditional methods in affecting real change and impacting policy outcomes? Or are those involved simply ‘clicktivists’ who show no more commitment than pressing a button? Professor Jacquelien van Stekelenburg argues that while online networks have increased political participation, by allowing participants to frame their ideas through interactions with allies and opponents, physical protests remain vital to achieving change in the age of social media. During the discussion, she outlines how online and offline campaigns can be effectively combined to deliver maximum political impact.

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