How Theology Stopped Being Regina Scientiarum: - and How Its Story Continues

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The view that theology represents the highest level of academic learning and the summit of human knowledge has a long history. In this article, starting from Aristotle, the genealogy of this view is excavated. Second, it is examined how and why theology lost this special status in modernity, as this appears in Immanuel Kant’s The Conflict of the Faculties (1798). Third, it is shown in which way and for what reasons theology continued to have a place of its own in the modern university since the founding of the University of Berlin (1810). In particular, the crucial role of Friedrich Schleiermacher’s proposal is highlighted. Fourth, it is suggested that, under certain conditions, theology can still be conceived as a proper university discipline in contemporary pluralistic societies.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
JournalStudies in Christian Ethics
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

Theology
Human Knowledge
Modernity
Aristotle
Founding
Genealogy
History

Keywords

  • Theology
  • philosophy
  • practical sciences
  • queen of the sciences
  • rationality
  • university

Cite this

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How Theology Stopped Being Regina Scientiarum : - and How Its Story Continues. / van den Brink, Gijsbert.

In: Studies in Christian Ethics, Vol. 32, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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