How well does a musculoskeletal model predict GH-joint contact forces? Comparison with in-vivo data

A. Asadi Nikooyan, H. E J Veeger, P. Westerhoff, F. Graichen, G. Bergmann, Frans C T van der Helm

    Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    The Delft Shoulder and Elbow Model (DSEM), a large-scale musculoskeletal model, allows for estimation of individual muscle and joint reaction forces in the shoulder and elbow complex. Although the model has been qualitatively verified previously using EMG signals, quantitative validation has not yet been feasible. In this paper we report on the validation of the DSEM by comparing the GH-joint contact forces estimated by the DSEM with the in-vivo forces measured by a recently developed instrumented shoulder endoprosthesis, capable of measuring the glenohumeral (GH) joint contact forces in-vivo [1]. To validate the model, two patients with instrumented shoulder hemi-arthroplasty were measured. The measurement process included the collection of motion data as well as in-vivo joint reaction forces. Segment and joint angles were used as the model inputs to estimate the GH-joint contact forces. The estimated and recorded GH-joint contact forces for Range of Motion (RoM) and force tasks were compared based on the magnitude of the resultant forces. The results show that the estimated force follows the measured force for abduction and anteflexion motions up to 80 and 50 degrees arm elevations, respectively, while they show different behaviors for angles above 90 degrees (decrease is estimated but increase is measured). The DSEM underestimates the peak force for RoM (up to 38% for abduction motion and 64% for anteflexion motion), while overestimates the peak forces (up to 90%) for most directions of performing the force tasks.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009
    Pages1575-1581
    Number of pages7
    VolumeParts A, B and C
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009
    EventASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009 - San Diego, CA, United States
    Duration: 30 Aug 20092 Sep 2009

    Publication series

    NameConference Proceedings
    Volume4

    Conference

    ConferenceASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009
    CountryUnited States
    CitySan Diego, CA
    Period30/08/092/09/09

    Fingerprint

    Contact Force
    Predict
    Motion
    Abduction
    Model
    Arthroplasty
    Degree Elevation
    Angle
    Muscle
    Range of data
    Decrease

    Cite this

    Nikooyan, A. A., Veeger, H. E. J., Westerhoff, P., Graichen, F., Bergmann, G., & van der Helm, F. C. T. (2009). How well does a musculoskeletal model predict GH-joint contact forces? Comparison with in-vivo data. In ASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009 (Vol. Parts A, B and C, pp. 1575-1581). (Conference Proceedings; Vol. 4). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2009-87332
    Nikooyan, A. Asadi ; Veeger, H. E J ; Westerhoff, P. ; Graichen, F. ; Bergmann, G. ; van der Helm, Frans C T. / How well does a musculoskeletal model predict GH-joint contact forces? Comparison with in-vivo data. ASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009. Vol. Parts A, B and C 2009. pp. 1575-1581 (Conference Proceedings).
    @inproceedings{1a5b3f88560740cd80719379a69b5895,
    title = "How well does a musculoskeletal model predict GH-joint contact forces? Comparison with in-vivo data",
    abstract = "The Delft Shoulder and Elbow Model (DSEM), a large-scale musculoskeletal model, allows for estimation of individual muscle and joint reaction forces in the shoulder and elbow complex. Although the model has been qualitatively verified previously using EMG signals, quantitative validation has not yet been feasible. In this paper we report on the validation of the DSEM by comparing the GH-joint contact forces estimated by the DSEM with the in-vivo forces measured by a recently developed instrumented shoulder endoprosthesis, capable of measuring the glenohumeral (GH) joint contact forces in-vivo [1]. To validate the model, two patients with instrumented shoulder hemi-arthroplasty were measured. The measurement process included the collection of motion data as well as in-vivo joint reaction forces. Segment and joint angles were used as the model inputs to estimate the GH-joint contact forces. The estimated and recorded GH-joint contact forces for Range of Motion (RoM) and force tasks were compared based on the magnitude of the resultant forces. The results show that the estimated force follows the measured force for abduction and anteflexion motions up to 80 and 50 degrees arm elevations, respectively, while they show different behaviors for angles above 90 degrees (decrease is estimated but increase is measured). The DSEM underestimates the peak force for RoM (up to 38{\%} for abduction motion and 64{\%} for anteflexion motion), while overestimates the peak forces (up to 90{\%}) for most directions of performing the force tasks.",
    author = "Nikooyan, {A. Asadi} and Veeger, {H. E J} and P. Westerhoff and F. Graichen and G. Bergmann and {van der Helm}, {Frans C T}",
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    Nikooyan, AA, Veeger, HEJ, Westerhoff, P, Graichen, F, Bergmann, G & van der Helm, FCT 2009, How well does a musculoskeletal model predict GH-joint contact forces? Comparison with in-vivo data. in ASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009. vol. Parts A, B and C, Conference Proceedings, vol. 4, pp. 1575-1581, ASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009, San Diego, CA, United States, 30/08/09. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2009-87332

    How well does a musculoskeletal model predict GH-joint contact forces? Comparison with in-vivo data. / Nikooyan, A. Asadi; Veeger, H. E J; Westerhoff, P.; Graichen, F.; Bergmann, G.; van der Helm, Frans C T.

    ASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009. Vol. Parts A, B and C 2009. p. 1575-1581 (Conference Proceedings; Vol. 4).

    Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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    AU - Nikooyan, A. Asadi

    AU - Veeger, H. E J

    AU - Westerhoff, P.

    AU - Graichen, F.

    AU - Bergmann, G.

    AU - van der Helm, Frans C T

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    N2 - The Delft Shoulder and Elbow Model (DSEM), a large-scale musculoskeletal model, allows for estimation of individual muscle and joint reaction forces in the shoulder and elbow complex. Although the model has been qualitatively verified previously using EMG signals, quantitative validation has not yet been feasible. In this paper we report on the validation of the DSEM by comparing the GH-joint contact forces estimated by the DSEM with the in-vivo forces measured by a recently developed instrumented shoulder endoprosthesis, capable of measuring the glenohumeral (GH) joint contact forces in-vivo [1]. To validate the model, two patients with instrumented shoulder hemi-arthroplasty were measured. The measurement process included the collection of motion data as well as in-vivo joint reaction forces. Segment and joint angles were used as the model inputs to estimate the GH-joint contact forces. The estimated and recorded GH-joint contact forces for Range of Motion (RoM) and force tasks were compared based on the magnitude of the resultant forces. The results show that the estimated force follows the measured force for abduction and anteflexion motions up to 80 and 50 degrees arm elevations, respectively, while they show different behaviors for angles above 90 degrees (decrease is estimated but increase is measured). The DSEM underestimates the peak force for RoM (up to 38% for abduction motion and 64% for anteflexion motion), while overestimates the peak forces (up to 90%) for most directions of performing the force tasks.

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    Nikooyan AA, Veeger HEJ, Westerhoff P, Graichen F, Bergmann G, van der Helm FCT. How well does a musculoskeletal model predict GH-joint contact forces? Comparison with in-vivo data. In ASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009. Vol. Parts A, B and C. 2009. p. 1575-1581. (Conference Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2009-87332