Identifying Two Family Members in Jacob Cornelisz’s Amsterdam Workshop: Cornelis Buys and Cornelis Anthonisz

D. Meuwissen, Molly Faries

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademic

Abstract

The Amsterdam painter, Jacob Cornelisz, established
one of the largest and most diversified workshops
of his time – as has been made abundantly clear by the
exhibitions in Alkmaar and Amsterdam in the spring of
2014. In this paper, the authors build on the research
associated with the exhibitions as well as discoveries
made by Amsterdam archivist, S.A.C. (Bas) Dudok van
Heel, in publishing the genealogy that included Jacob
Cornelisz along with other painters known as Cornelis
Buys. These insights open up possibilities for new attributions,
allowing the identification of one workshop assistant
as Cornelis Jacobsz alias Cornelis Buys, Jacob Cornelisz’s
eldest son, and the identification of another assistant,
the Berlin Sketchbook Master, as Jacob’s grandson, Cornelis
Anthonisz. This, in turn, reveals hitherto unknown
contributions made to Jacob’s shop by Jan van Scorel
after his return from Italy in 1524.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-308
Number of pages10
JournalUnderdrawing and Technology in Painting.Symposium XIX. Technical Studies of Paintings: Problems of Attribution (15th-17th Centuries).
VolumeXIX
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018

Fingerprint

Amsterdam
Painters
Attribution
Italy
Genealogy
Archivists
Spring
Alias
Sketchbooks

Keywords

  • Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen
  • Cornelis Buys
  • Workshop practice
  • Amsterdam

Cite this

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title = "Identifying Two Family Members in Jacob Cornelisz’s Amsterdam Workshop: Cornelis Buys and Cornelis Anthonisz",
abstract = "The Amsterdam painter, Jacob Cornelisz, establishedone of the largest and most diversified workshopsof his time – as has been made abundantly clear by theexhibitions in Alkmaar and Amsterdam in the spring of2014. In this paper, the authors build on the researchassociated with the exhibitions as well as discoveriesmade by Amsterdam archivist, S.A.C. (Bas) Dudok vanHeel, in publishing the genealogy that included JacobCornelisz along with other painters known as CornelisBuys. These insights open up possibilities for new attributions,allowing the identification of one workshop assistantas Cornelis Jacobsz alias Cornelis Buys, Jacob Cornelisz’seldest son, and the identification of another assistant,the Berlin Sketchbook Master, as Jacob’s grandson, CornelisAnthonisz. This, in turn, reveals hitherto unknowncontributions made to Jacob’s shop by Jan van Scorelafter his return from Italy in 1524.",
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