Impact of Children's math self-concept, math self-efficacy, math anxiety, and teacher competencies on math development

Jarise Kaskens*, Eliane Segers, Sui Lin Goei, Johannes E.H. van Luit, Ludo Verhoeven

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We examined to what extent children's development of arithmetic fluency and mathematical problem-solving was influenced by their math self-concept, math self-efficacy, and math anxiety but also teacher competence, specifically: actual teaching behavior, self-efficacy, and mathematical teaching knowledge. Participants were 610 children and 31 teachers of grade four. Multi-level analyses showed children's math self-concept to be a positive predictor of arithmetic fluency and actual teaching behavior to be a negative predictor. The development of mathematical problem-solving was predicted: positively by mathematical teaching knowledge; negatively by actual teaching behavior and teachers’ self-efficacy; and not at all by the child factors of math self-concept, math self-efficacy, or math anxiety. Promoting the self-confidence of young children is essential for their mathematical development. More research into the relationship between teaching behaviors and children's math development is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103096
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume94
Early online date3 May 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Math development
  • Mathematical knowledge for teaching
  • Mathematics education
  • Self-beliefs
  • Self-efficacy
  • Teacher behavior

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