Improving mobility performance in wheelchair basketball

Thom T.J. Veeger, Annemarie M.H. de Witte, Monique A.M. Berger, Rienk M.A. van der Slikke, Dirkjan H.E.J. Veeger, Marco J.M. Hoozemans

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to investigate which characteristics of athlete, wheelchair and athlete-wheelchair interface are the best predictors of wheelchair basketball mobility performance. Design: A total of 60 experienced wheelchair basketball players performed a wheelchair mobility performance test to assess their mobility performance. To determine which variables were the best predictors of mobility performance, forward stepwise linear regression analyses were performed on a set of 33 characteristics, including 10 athlete, 19 wheelchair, and 4 athlete-wheelchair interface characteristics. Results: A total of 8 of the characteristics turned out to be significant predictors of wheelchair basketball mobility performance. Classification, experience, maximal isometric force, wheel axis height, and hand rim diameter-which both are interchangeable with each other and wheel diameter-camber angle, and the vertical distance between shoulder and rear wheel axis-which was interchangeable with seat height-were positively associated with mobility performance. The vertical distance between the front seat and the footrest was negatively associated with mobility performance. Conclusion: With this insight, coaches and biomechanical specialists are provided with statistical findings to determine which characteristics they could focus on best to improve mobility performance. Six out of 8 predictors are modifiable and can be optimized to improve mobility performance. These adjustments could be carried out both in training (maximal isometric force) and in wheelchair configurations (eg, camber angle).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-66
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of sport rehabilitation
Volume28
Issue number1
Early online date16 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Basketball
Wheelchairs
Athletes
Linear Models
Hand
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Athletic performance
  • Paralympic
  • Wheelchair configuration
  • Wheelchair-athlete interface

Cite this

Veeger, Thom T.J. ; de Witte, Annemarie M.H. ; Berger, Monique A.M. ; van der Slikke, Rienk M.A. ; Veeger, Dirkjan H.E.J. ; Hoozemans, Marco J.M. / Improving mobility performance in wheelchair basketball. In: Journal of sport rehabilitation. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 59-66.
@article{53383fcf0cf6479182ecc8c1736dc093,
title = "Improving mobility performance in wheelchair basketball",
abstract = "Objective: This study aimed to investigate which characteristics of athlete, wheelchair and athlete-wheelchair interface are the best predictors of wheelchair basketball mobility performance. Design: A total of 60 experienced wheelchair basketball players performed a wheelchair mobility performance test to assess their mobility performance. To determine which variables were the best predictors of mobility performance, forward stepwise linear regression analyses were performed on a set of 33 characteristics, including 10 athlete, 19 wheelchair, and 4 athlete-wheelchair interface characteristics. Results: A total of 8 of the characteristics turned out to be significant predictors of wheelchair basketball mobility performance. Classification, experience, maximal isometric force, wheel axis height, and hand rim diameter-which both are interchangeable with each other and wheel diameter-camber angle, and the vertical distance between shoulder and rear wheel axis-which was interchangeable with seat height-were positively associated with mobility performance. The vertical distance between the front seat and the footrest was negatively associated with mobility performance. Conclusion: With this insight, coaches and biomechanical specialists are provided with statistical findings to determine which characteristics they could focus on best to improve mobility performance. Six out of 8 predictors are modifiable and can be optimized to improve mobility performance. These adjustments could be carried out both in training (maximal isometric force) and in wheelchair configurations (eg, camber angle).",
keywords = "Athletic performance, Paralympic, Wheelchair configuration, Wheelchair-athlete interface",
author = "Veeger, {Thom T.J.} and {de Witte}, {Annemarie M.H.} and Berger, {Monique A.M.} and {van der Slikke}, {Rienk M.A.} and Veeger, {Dirkjan H.E.J.} and Hoozemans, {Marco J.M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1123/jsr.2017-0142",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "59--66",
journal = "Journal of sport rehabilitation",
issn = "1056-6716",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "1",

}

Improving mobility performance in wheelchair basketball. / Veeger, Thom T.J.; de Witte, Annemarie M.H.; Berger, Monique A.M.; van der Slikke, Rienk M.A.; Veeger, Dirkjan H.E.J.; Hoozemans, Marco J.M.

In: Journal of sport rehabilitation, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.2019, p. 59-66.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving mobility performance in wheelchair basketball

AU - Veeger, Thom T.J.

AU - de Witte, Annemarie M.H.

AU - Berger, Monique A.M.

AU - van der Slikke, Rienk M.A.

AU - Veeger, Dirkjan H.E.J.

AU - Hoozemans, Marco J.M.

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - Objective: This study aimed to investigate which characteristics of athlete, wheelchair and athlete-wheelchair interface are the best predictors of wheelchair basketball mobility performance. Design: A total of 60 experienced wheelchair basketball players performed a wheelchair mobility performance test to assess their mobility performance. To determine which variables were the best predictors of mobility performance, forward stepwise linear regression analyses were performed on a set of 33 characteristics, including 10 athlete, 19 wheelchair, and 4 athlete-wheelchair interface characteristics. Results: A total of 8 of the characteristics turned out to be significant predictors of wheelchair basketball mobility performance. Classification, experience, maximal isometric force, wheel axis height, and hand rim diameter-which both are interchangeable with each other and wheel diameter-camber angle, and the vertical distance between shoulder and rear wheel axis-which was interchangeable with seat height-were positively associated with mobility performance. The vertical distance between the front seat and the footrest was negatively associated with mobility performance. Conclusion: With this insight, coaches and biomechanical specialists are provided with statistical findings to determine which characteristics they could focus on best to improve mobility performance. Six out of 8 predictors are modifiable and can be optimized to improve mobility performance. These adjustments could be carried out both in training (maximal isometric force) and in wheelchair configurations (eg, camber angle).

AB - Objective: This study aimed to investigate which characteristics of athlete, wheelchair and athlete-wheelchair interface are the best predictors of wheelchair basketball mobility performance. Design: A total of 60 experienced wheelchair basketball players performed a wheelchair mobility performance test to assess their mobility performance. To determine which variables were the best predictors of mobility performance, forward stepwise linear regression analyses were performed on a set of 33 characteristics, including 10 athlete, 19 wheelchair, and 4 athlete-wheelchair interface characteristics. Results: A total of 8 of the characteristics turned out to be significant predictors of wheelchair basketball mobility performance. Classification, experience, maximal isometric force, wheel axis height, and hand rim diameter-which both are interchangeable with each other and wheel diameter-camber angle, and the vertical distance between shoulder and rear wheel axis-which was interchangeable with seat height-were positively associated with mobility performance. The vertical distance between the front seat and the footrest was negatively associated with mobility performance. Conclusion: With this insight, coaches and biomechanical specialists are provided with statistical findings to determine which characteristics they could focus on best to improve mobility performance. Six out of 8 predictors are modifiable and can be optimized to improve mobility performance. These adjustments could be carried out both in training (maximal isometric force) and in wheelchair configurations (eg, camber angle).

KW - Athletic performance

KW - Paralympic

KW - Wheelchair configuration

KW - Wheelchair-athlete interface

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061904373&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061904373&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/jsr.2017-0142

DO - 10.1123/jsr.2017-0142

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 59

EP - 66

JO - Journal of sport rehabilitation

JF - Journal of sport rehabilitation

SN - 1056-6716

IS - 1

ER -