Indicators to estimate the appropriateness of activating interventions for people living with dementia and for their informal caregivers

Netta Van't Leven, Eva Van der Ploeg, Jacomine de Lange, Anne Margriet Pot

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Dyadic activating interventions support both people with dementia and their informal caregivers to maintain activities. For a person-centered approach referrers need insight in how specific interventions might meet individual needs, characteristics, and preferences of a dyad. This study aimed to develop a set of indicators for three psychosocial dyadic, activating interventions.

METHOD: We used the 'RAND Appropriateness Method' directed at agreement on indicators within a panel of experts. Qualitative research had identified 31 relevant conceptual indicators. A panel of 12 experts in dementia care rated the extent to which these indicators are recognizable in their clinical practice. Indicators with median ratings in the top third segment of the nine-point-scale were considered recognizable.

RESULTS: 18/31 conceptual indicators (58%) were found recognizable in 75%-90% of the panelists' clients. Although consensus on the recognizability of some indicators about the need or preference for physical and social activities was lacking, the respondents nevertheless recommended including these in regular assessments. Other indicators were judged too difficult to recognize in clinical practice.

CONCLUSION: The selected indicators offer guidance to referrers on what intervention(s) to choose, and discuss the appropriateness in a shared decision-making process, thus contributing to a person-centered approach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAging and Mental Health
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Aug 2017

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • caregivers
  • indicators
  • intervention
  • person-centered care

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