Inducing Anxiety through Video Material

T. Bosse, C. Gerritsen, J. de Man, Marco Stam

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

For professionals in various domains, training based on Virtual Reality can be an interesting method to improve their emotion regulation skills. However, for such a training system to be effective, it is essential to trigger the desired emotional state in the trainee. Hence, an important question is to what extent virtual stimuli have the ability to induce an emotional stress response. This paper addresses this question by studying the impact of anxiety-inducing video material on skin conductance, heart rate and subjective experience of participants that watch the videos. The results indicate that the scary videos significantly increased skin conductance and subjective response, while no significant effect on heart rate was found. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationHCI International 2014 - Posters' Extended Abstracts
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages301-306
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Bosse, T., Gerritsen, C., de Man, J., & Stam, M. (2014). Inducing Anxiety through Video Material. In HCI International 2014 - Posters' Extended Abstracts (pp. 301-306). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07857-1_53
Bosse, T. ; Gerritsen, C. ; de Man, J. ; Stam, Marco. / Inducing Anxiety through Video Material. HCI International 2014 - Posters' Extended Abstracts. Springer Verlag, 2014. pp. 301-306
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Bosse, T, Gerritsen, C, de Man, J & Stam, M 2014, Inducing Anxiety through Video Material. in HCI International 2014 - Posters' Extended Abstracts. Springer Verlag, pp. 301-306. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07857-1_53

Inducing Anxiety through Video Material. / Bosse, T.; Gerritsen, C.; de Man, J.; Stam, Marco.

HCI International 2014 - Posters' Extended Abstracts. Springer Verlag, 2014. p. 301-306.

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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Bosse T, Gerritsen C, de Man J, Stam M. Inducing Anxiety through Video Material. In HCI International 2014 - Posters' Extended Abstracts. Springer Verlag. 2014. p. 301-306 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07857-1_53