Institutional Resolutions of Mass Actions in Post-Reform China: An Interdisciplinary Study of Internal Functionality and Externally Perceived Functionality

Research output: PhD ThesisPhD-Thesis – Research and graduation external

Abstract

My dissertation bridges the wisdom of legal and political scholars to make sense of the governance system as the basic context where the administrative justice norms and mechanisms evolved. Focusing on a rather insufficiently explored subject: complainants questioning the content and/or implementation of government policies in China (‘mass actions’), it develops a credibility-focused frame to explain why certain norms have been accepted by the government over time, through what mechanisms these accepted norms are being applied in resolving mass actions, and how are they popularly perceived in the news discourse.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationPhD
Awarding Institution
  • Utrecht University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Zwart, Tom, Supervisor, External person
  • van den Hoven, Paul, Co-supervisor, External person
Thesis sponsors
Award date31 Aug 2018
Place of PublicationBerlin
Edition2017
Electronic ISBNs10.1515/ajle-2016-0030
Publication statusUnpublished - 21 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • China
  • Administrative Justice
  • Institutional Resolutions
  • Labour Action
  • Collective Action
  • Rural Demonstration
  • News Discourse

VU Research Profile

  • Governance for Society

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