. Interparental violence; similarities and discrepancies between narratives of mothers and their children.

F.B. van Rooij, W. van der Schuur, J. Mak, M. Steketee, T.V.M. Pels

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Previous studies and intervention programs on interparental violence have relied largely on reports either solely from parents or solely from children. Nevertheless, the literature and the theoretical background provide indications of the existence of discrepancies between the narratives of parents and those of children. This study therefore focuses on similarities and differences between the narratives of mothers and those of their children with regard to the children’s exposure to interparental violence and its impact on child and parental functioning. In depth open interviews were conducted to assess the narratives of 36 mothers (27–59 years of age) and 43 of their children (17 boys and 26 girls; 9–25 years of age) who had experienced interparental violence in their past. A hierarchical coding system was used to code the interviews. Thereafter, the differences between mother and child narratives were analyzed based on the coded fragments. Few differences were found between the narratives with regard to parental functioning. We did find discrepancies, however, with regard to the children’s exposure to interparental violence and its impact on child functioning. Exploratory analyses showed relationships between the discrepancies and the severity of the violence and age of the children. More attention to these differences is essential in order to enhance our knowledge concerning the complex impact of violence on family members and to improve support geared to their specific needs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3350-3362
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '. Interparental violence; similarities and discrepancies between narratives of mothers and their children.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this