Involving relatives in emergency psychiatry: an observational patient-control study in a crisis resolution and home treatment team

Flip Jan van Oenen*, Suzy Schipper, Rien Van, Irene Visch, Jaap Peen, Jurgen Cornelis, Robert Schoevers, Jack Dekker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The involvement of relatives is seen as an important element of treatment in crisis resolution and in home treatment teams. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of involving relatives in treatment during a crisis situation. The outcomes for patients from a relatives-involved group (RIG) and relatives-not-involved group (RNIG) were compared. Relatives were provided with general information about the service and assessments, psycho-education and, in some cases, additional family interventions. Relatives were involved in the treatment of 168 of 263 patients (64 per cent). There were no significant differences between the RIG and RNIG in terms of mean scores for BSI at T12. The involvement of relatives was achieved in the majority of cases. No link with outcomes was found. Since involvement of relatives was not randomized and the number and duration of contacts with relatives were limited, these findings should be interpreted cautiously. Practitioner points: Using a structured motivational model, it is possible to involve relatives in the treatment of psychiatric crisis patients in the majority of cases There is no reason to be reticent about involving relatives in treatment, even if patients seem to be reluctant at first sight Living alone was in this study identified as a negative predictor of family involvement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)584-601
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Family Therapy
Volume40
Issue number4
Early online date11 Aug 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Keywords

  • crisis
  • emergency psychiatry
  • family
  • home treatment
  • relatives

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