Iranian diaspora and the new media: From political action to humanitarian help

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This article looks at the shifting position of the 'Iranian diaspora' in relation to Iran as it is influenced by online and offline transnational networks. In the 1980s the exilic identity of a large part of the Iranian diaspora was the core factor in establishing an extended, yet exclusive form of transnational network. Since then, the patterns of identity within this community have shifted towards a more inclusive network as a result of those transnational connections, leading to more extensive and intense connections and activities between the Iranian diaspora and Iranians in Iran. The main concern of the article is to examine how the narratives of identity are constructed and transformed within Iranian (charity) networks and to identify the factors that contribute to this transformation. The authors use the transnational lens to view diasporic positioning as linked to development issues. New technological sources help diaspora groups, in this case Iranians, to build virtual embedded ties that transcend nation states and borders. Yet, the study also shows that these transnational connections can still be challenged by the nation state, as has been the case with recent developments in Iran. © Institute of Social Studies 2009.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)667-691
Number of pages25
JournalDevelopment and Change
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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diaspora
political action
new media
Iran
nation state
social studies
positioning
narrative
community
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title = "Iranian diaspora and the new media: From political action to humanitarian help",
abstract = "This article looks at the shifting position of the 'Iranian diaspora' in relation to Iran as it is influenced by online and offline transnational networks. In the 1980s the exilic identity of a large part of the Iranian diaspora was the core factor in establishing an extended, yet exclusive form of transnational network. Since then, the patterns of identity within this community have shifted towards a more inclusive network as a result of those transnational connections, leading to more extensive and intense connections and activities between the Iranian diaspora and Iranians in Iran. The main concern of the article is to examine how the narratives of identity are constructed and transformed within Iranian (charity) networks and to identify the factors that contribute to this transformation. The authors use the transnational lens to view diasporic positioning as linked to development issues. New technological sources help diaspora groups, in this case Iranians, to build virtual embedded ties that transcend nation states and borders. Yet, the study also shows that these transnational connections can still be challenged by the nation state, as has been the case with recent developments in Iran. {\circledC} Institute of Social Studies 2009.",
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Iranian diaspora and the new media: From political action to humanitarian help. / Ghorashi, H.; Boersma, F.K.

In: Development and Change, Vol. 40, No. 4, 2009, p. 667-691.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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