Is a schizo-obsessive subtype associated with cognitive impairment?: results from a large cross-sectional study in patients with psychosis and their unaffected relatives.

J.H. Meijer, M. Swets, S. Keeman, D.H. Nieman, C.J. Meijer, R.S. Kahn, D.H. Linszen, J. van Os, D. Wiersma, R. Bruggeman, W. Cahn, L. de Haan, L. Krabbendam, I. Myin-Germeys

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The current study investigated whether candidate cognitive endophenotypes may be used to validate a schizo-obsessive subtype. Using within-subject random effect regression analyses and cross-trait cross-relative analyses, we evaluated the association between obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCSs) and cognitive performance in 984 patients with nonaffective psychosis (22.5% with OCSs), 973 unaffected siblings (7.7% with OCSs), 851 parents (4.2% with OCSs), and 573 controls (4.5% with OCSs). No significant within-subject associations between OCSs and cognitive functioning were found for patients and siblings. Severity of OCSs was associated with worse set-shifting ability in parents and worse processing speed in controls, but effect sizes were small (0.10 and 0.05 respectively). Cross-trait cross-relative analyses yielded no significant results. Contrary to our expectations, neither within-subject analyses nor cross-relative analyses yielded a clear association between OCSs and cognitive performance. Results do not support a schizo-obsessive subtype associated with cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-5
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume201
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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