Is interlimb coordination during walking preserved in children with cerebral palsy?

Pieter Meyns, Leen Van Gestel, Sjoerd M Bruijn, Kaat Desloovere, Stephan P Swinnen, Jacques Duysens

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Arm movements during gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP) are altered compared to typically developing children (TD). We investigated whether these changes in arm movements alter interlimb coordination in CP gait. 3D gait analysis was performed in CP (diplegia [DI]: N = 15 and hemiplegia [HE]: N = 11) and TD (N = 24) children at preferred and fast walking speeds. Mean Relative Phase (MRP, i.e. mean over the gait cycle of the Continuous Relative Phase or CRP) was calculated as a measure of coordination, standard deviation of CRP was used as a measure of coordinative stability, and the sign of MRP indicated which limb was leading (for all pair combinations of the four limbs). In HE, coordination was significantly altered, less stable and a different leading limb was found compared to TD whenever the most affected arm was included in the studied limb pair. In DI, coordination deteriorated significantly when any of the two legs was included in the studied limb pair, and coordinative stability was significantly affected when any of the two arms was included. In almost all limb pair combinations, a different limb was leading in DI compared to TD. Increasing walking speed significantly improved coordination and coordinative stability of several limb pairs in DI. Coordination and limb-leading deficits were mostly linked to the affected limb. The compensating (non-affected) arm primarily affected coordinative stability, which underlines the importance of active arm movements in HE. Increasing walking speed may be used to improve interlimb coordination in DI.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1418-28
    Number of pages11
    JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
    Volume33
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2012

    Fingerprint

    Cerebral Palsy
    Walking
    Extremities
    Arm
    Gait
    Hemiplegia
    Leg

    Keywords

    • Arm
    • Biomechanical Phenomena
    • Cerebral Palsy
    • Child
    • Child, Preschool
    • Female
    • Gait
    • Hemiplegia
    • Humans
    • Leg
    • Male
    • Motor Skills Disorders
    • Muscle Weakness
    • Walking
    • Journal Article
    • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Cite this

    Meyns, Pieter ; Van Gestel, Leen ; Bruijn, Sjoerd M ; Desloovere, Kaat ; Swinnen, Stephan P ; Duysens, Jacques. / Is interlimb coordination during walking preserved in children with cerebral palsy?. In: Research in Developmental Disabilities. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 1418-28.
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    title = "Is interlimb coordination during walking preserved in children with cerebral palsy?",
    abstract = "Arm movements during gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP) are altered compared to typically developing children (TD). We investigated whether these changes in arm movements alter interlimb coordination in CP gait. 3D gait analysis was performed in CP (diplegia [DI]: N = 15 and hemiplegia [HE]: N = 11) and TD (N = 24) children at preferred and fast walking speeds. Mean Relative Phase (MRP, i.e. mean over the gait cycle of the Continuous Relative Phase or CRP) was calculated as a measure of coordination, standard deviation of CRP was used as a measure of coordinative stability, and the sign of MRP indicated which limb was leading (for all pair combinations of the four limbs). In HE, coordination was significantly altered, less stable and a different leading limb was found compared to TD whenever the most affected arm was included in the studied limb pair. In DI, coordination deteriorated significantly when any of the two legs was included in the studied limb pair, and coordinative stability was significantly affected when any of the two arms was included. In almost all limb pair combinations, a different limb was leading in DI compared to TD. Increasing walking speed significantly improved coordination and coordinative stability of several limb pairs in DI. Coordination and limb-leading deficits were mostly linked to the affected limb. The compensating (non-affected) arm primarily affected coordinative stability, which underlines the importance of active arm movements in HE. Increasing walking speed may be used to improve interlimb coordination in DI.",
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    Is interlimb coordination during walking preserved in children with cerebral palsy? / Meyns, Pieter; Van Gestel, Leen; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Desloovere, Kaat; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques.

    In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 33, No. 5, 24.04.2012, p. 1418-28.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    T1 - Is interlimb coordination during walking preserved in children with cerebral palsy?

    AU - Meyns, Pieter

    AU - Van Gestel, Leen

    AU - Bruijn, Sjoerd M

    AU - Desloovere, Kaat

    AU - Swinnen, Stephan P

    AU - Duysens, Jacques

    N1 - Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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    N2 - Arm movements during gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP) are altered compared to typically developing children (TD). We investigated whether these changes in arm movements alter interlimb coordination in CP gait. 3D gait analysis was performed in CP (diplegia [DI]: N = 15 and hemiplegia [HE]: N = 11) and TD (N = 24) children at preferred and fast walking speeds. Mean Relative Phase (MRP, i.e. mean over the gait cycle of the Continuous Relative Phase or CRP) was calculated as a measure of coordination, standard deviation of CRP was used as a measure of coordinative stability, and the sign of MRP indicated which limb was leading (for all pair combinations of the four limbs). In HE, coordination was significantly altered, less stable and a different leading limb was found compared to TD whenever the most affected arm was included in the studied limb pair. In DI, coordination deteriorated significantly when any of the two legs was included in the studied limb pair, and coordinative stability was significantly affected when any of the two arms was included. In almost all limb pair combinations, a different limb was leading in DI compared to TD. Increasing walking speed significantly improved coordination and coordinative stability of several limb pairs in DI. Coordination and limb-leading deficits were mostly linked to the affected limb. The compensating (non-affected) arm primarily affected coordinative stability, which underlines the importance of active arm movements in HE. Increasing walking speed may be used to improve interlimb coordination in DI.

    AB - Arm movements during gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP) are altered compared to typically developing children (TD). We investigated whether these changes in arm movements alter interlimb coordination in CP gait. 3D gait analysis was performed in CP (diplegia [DI]: N = 15 and hemiplegia [HE]: N = 11) and TD (N = 24) children at preferred and fast walking speeds. Mean Relative Phase (MRP, i.e. mean over the gait cycle of the Continuous Relative Phase or CRP) was calculated as a measure of coordination, standard deviation of CRP was used as a measure of coordinative stability, and the sign of MRP indicated which limb was leading (for all pair combinations of the four limbs). In HE, coordination was significantly altered, less stable and a different leading limb was found compared to TD whenever the most affected arm was included in the studied limb pair. In DI, coordination deteriorated significantly when any of the two legs was included in the studied limb pair, and coordinative stability was significantly affected when any of the two arms was included. In almost all limb pair combinations, a different limb was leading in DI compared to TD. Increasing walking speed significantly improved coordination and coordinative stability of several limb pairs in DI. Coordination and limb-leading deficits were mostly linked to the affected limb. The compensating (non-affected) arm primarily affected coordinative stability, which underlines the importance of active arm movements in HE. Increasing walking speed may be used to improve interlimb coordination in DI.

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    KW - Cerebral Palsy

    KW - Child

    KW - Child, Preschool

    KW - Female

    KW - Gait

    KW - Hemiplegia

    KW - Humans

    KW - Leg

    KW - Male

    KW - Motor Skills Disorders

    KW - Muscle Weakness

    KW - Walking

    KW - Journal Article

    KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    U2 - 10.1016/j.ridd.2012.03.020

    DO - 10.1016/j.ridd.2012.03.020

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    SP - 1418

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    JO - Research in Developmental Disabilities

    JF - Research in Developmental Disabilities

    SN - 0891-4222

    IS - 5

    ER -