Is the psoas a hip flexor in the active straight leg raise?

H. Hu, O.G. Meijer, J.H. van Dieen, P.W. Hodges, S.M. Bruijn, R.L.M. Strijers, P.W.B. Nanayakkara, B.J. van Royen, W Wu, C. Xia

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Psoas function is a topic of considerable relevance in sports and clinical science. However, the literature on psoas function is not sufficiently consistent. Questions are, amongst others, if during hip flexion the psoas always has the same function as the iliacus, and if the psoas affects the hip more than the lumbar spine. In the present study, 17 healthy women, 20-40 years, performed the active straight leg raise (ASLR), with the right or the left leg ("Side"), and without or with weight added above the ankle ("Condition"). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of psoas and iliacus were recorded with fine-wire electrodes, and of rectus femoris and adductor longus with surface electrodes, all on the right side. Movements of the leg were recorded with active markers and a camera system. During ASLR, the iliacus, rectus femoris, adductor longus and psoas were active ipsilaterally, but psoas was also active contralaterally. All muscles started to contract before movement onset, the iliacus, rectus femoris, and adductor longus largely at the same time, before the psoas. There was no significant difference between the amplitude or time of onset of ipsilateral and contralateral psoas EMG activity, nor was there a significant interaction between Side and Condition for the psoas. Although ipsilateral psoas activity is consistent with the psoas being a hip flexor, contralateral activity is not. The most simplest explanation of the pattern found is that the psoas is bilaterally recruited to stabilize the lumbar spine, probably in the frontal plane. © 2010 The Author(s).
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages759-765
    JournalEuropean Spine Journal
    Volume20
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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    Hip
    Leg
    Quadriceps Muscle
    Electrodes
    Spine
    Ankle
    Sports
    Weights and Measures
    Muscles

    Cite this

    Hu, H. ; Meijer, O.G. ; van Dieen, J.H. ; Hodges, P.W. ; Bruijn, S.M. ; Strijers, R.L.M. ; Nanayakkara, P.W.B. ; van Royen, B.J. ; Wu, W ; Xia, C. / Is the psoas a hip flexor in the active straight leg raise?. In: European Spine Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 759-765.
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    abstract = "Psoas function is a topic of considerable relevance in sports and clinical science. However, the literature on psoas function is not sufficiently consistent. Questions are, amongst others, if during hip flexion the psoas always has the same function as the iliacus, and if the psoas affects the hip more than the lumbar spine. In the present study, 17 healthy women, 20-40 years, performed the active straight leg raise (ASLR), with the right or the left leg ({"}Side{"}), and without or with weight added above the ankle ({"}Condition{"}). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of psoas and iliacus were recorded with fine-wire electrodes, and of rectus femoris and adductor longus with surface electrodes, all on the right side. Movements of the leg were recorded with active markers and a camera system. During ASLR, the iliacus, rectus femoris, adductor longus and psoas were active ipsilaterally, but psoas was also active contralaterally. All muscles started to contract before movement onset, the iliacus, rectus femoris, and adductor longus largely at the same time, before the psoas. There was no significant difference between the amplitude or time of onset of ipsilateral and contralateral psoas EMG activity, nor was there a significant interaction between Side and Condition for the psoas. Although ipsilateral psoas activity is consistent with the psoas being a hip flexor, contralateral activity is not. The most simplest explanation of the pattern found is that the psoas is bilaterally recruited to stabilize the lumbar spine, probably in the frontal plane. {\circledC} 2010 The Author(s).",
    author = "H. Hu and O.G. Meijer and {van Dieen}, J.H. and P.W. Hodges and S.M. Bruijn and R.L.M. Strijers and P.W.B. Nanayakkara and {van Royen}, B.J. and W Wu and C. Xia",
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    doi = "10.1007/s00586-010-1508-5",
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    Hu, H, Meijer, OG, van Dieen, JH, Hodges, PW, Bruijn, SM, Strijers, RLM, Nanayakkara, PWB, van Royen, BJ, Wu, W & Xia, C 2011, 'Is the psoas a hip flexor in the active straight leg raise?', European Spine Journal, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 759-765. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-010-1508-5

    Is the psoas a hip flexor in the active straight leg raise? / Hu, H.; Meijer, O.G.; van Dieen, J.H.; Hodges, P.W.; Bruijn, S.M.; Strijers, R.L.M.; Nanayakkara, P.W.B.; van Royen, B.J.; Wu, W; Xia, C.

    In: European Spine Journal, Vol. 20, No. 5, 2011, p. 759-765.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    AU - Meijer, O.G.

    AU - van Dieen, J.H.

    AU - Hodges, P.W.

    AU - Bruijn, S.M.

    AU - Strijers, R.L.M.

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    AU - van Royen, B.J.

    AU - Wu, W

    AU - Xia, C.

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    N2 - Psoas function is a topic of considerable relevance in sports and clinical science. However, the literature on psoas function is not sufficiently consistent. Questions are, amongst others, if during hip flexion the psoas always has the same function as the iliacus, and if the psoas affects the hip more than the lumbar spine. In the present study, 17 healthy women, 20-40 years, performed the active straight leg raise (ASLR), with the right or the left leg ("Side"), and without or with weight added above the ankle ("Condition"). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of psoas and iliacus were recorded with fine-wire electrodes, and of rectus femoris and adductor longus with surface electrodes, all on the right side. Movements of the leg were recorded with active markers and a camera system. During ASLR, the iliacus, rectus femoris, adductor longus and psoas were active ipsilaterally, but psoas was also active contralaterally. All muscles started to contract before movement onset, the iliacus, rectus femoris, and adductor longus largely at the same time, before the psoas. There was no significant difference between the amplitude or time of onset of ipsilateral and contralateral psoas EMG activity, nor was there a significant interaction between Side and Condition for the psoas. Although ipsilateral psoas activity is consistent with the psoas being a hip flexor, contralateral activity is not. The most simplest explanation of the pattern found is that the psoas is bilaterally recruited to stabilize the lumbar spine, probably in the frontal plane. © 2010 The Author(s).

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    DO - 10.1007/s00586-010-1508-5

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