Isolating therapeutic procedures to investigate mechanisms of change in cognitive behavioral therapy for depression

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background:
Isolating a therapeutic procedure might be a powerful way to enhance our understanding of how cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) works. The present study explored new methods to isolate cognitive procedures and to study their direct impact on hypothesized underlying processes and CBT outcome.

Method:
The effects of a cognitive therapy skill acquisition procedure (n = 36) were compared to no procedure (n = 36) on cognitive therapy skills, dysfunctional thinking, distress, and mood in response to induced distress following a social stress test in healthy participants.

Results:
Participants reported more cognitive therapy skills after the procedure that focused on the acquisition of cognitive therapy skills compared to no procedure, but there were no differences in dysfunctional thinking, distress, and mood between the groups.

Conclusions:
By demonstrating an experimental approach to investigate mechanisms of change, including the pitfalls that come along with it, the present experiment provides a blueprint for other researchers interested in the underlying mechanisms of change in CBT for depression.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychopathology
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

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Bibliographical note

Article first published online: October 22, 2018

Keywords

  • Cognitive therapy skills
  • depression
  • therapeutic procedures
  • treatment process
  • Trier social stress test

Cite this

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title = "Isolating therapeutic procedures to investigate mechanisms of change in cognitive behavioral therapy for depression",
abstract = "Background:Isolating a therapeutic procedure might be a powerful way to enhance our understanding of how cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) works. The present study explored new methods to isolate cognitive procedures and to study their direct impact on hypothesized underlying processes and CBT outcome.Method:The effects of a cognitive therapy skill acquisition procedure (n = 36) were compared to no procedure (n = 36) on cognitive therapy skills, dysfunctional thinking, distress, and mood in response to induced distress following a social stress test in healthy participants.Results:Participants reported more cognitive therapy skills after the procedure that focused on the acquisition of cognitive therapy skills compared to no procedure, but there were no differences in dysfunctional thinking, distress, and mood between the groups.Conclusions:By demonstrating an experimental approach to investigate mechanisms of change, including the pitfalls that come along with it, the present experiment provides a blueprint for other researchers interested in the underlying mechanisms of change in CBT for depression.",
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Isolating therapeutic procedures to investigate mechanisms of change in cognitive behavioral therapy for depression. / Bruijniks, Sanne J.E.; Sijbrandij, Marit; Schlinkert, Caroline; Huibers, Marcus J.H.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychopathology, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.10.2018, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Schlinkert, Caroline

AU - Huibers, Marcus J.H.

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N2 - Background:Isolating a therapeutic procedure might be a powerful way to enhance our understanding of how cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) works. The present study explored new methods to isolate cognitive procedures and to study their direct impact on hypothesized underlying processes and CBT outcome.Method:The effects of a cognitive therapy skill acquisition procedure (n = 36) were compared to no procedure (n = 36) on cognitive therapy skills, dysfunctional thinking, distress, and mood in response to induced distress following a social stress test in healthy participants.Results:Participants reported more cognitive therapy skills after the procedure that focused on the acquisition of cognitive therapy skills compared to no procedure, but there were no differences in dysfunctional thinking, distress, and mood between the groups.Conclusions:By demonstrating an experimental approach to investigate mechanisms of change, including the pitfalls that come along with it, the present experiment provides a blueprint for other researchers interested in the underlying mechanisms of change in CBT for depression.

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