It’s not just what is said, but when it’s said: A temporal account of verbal behaviors and emergent leadership in self-managed teams

Fabiola H. Gerpott, Nale Lehmann-Willenbrock, Sven C. Voelpel, Mark Van Vugt

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

“Emergent leadership”—the ascription of informal leadership responsibilities among team members—is a dynamic phenomenon that comes into place through social interactions. Yet, theory remains sparse about the importance of verbal behaviors for emergent leadership in self-managed teams over a team’s lifecycle. Adopting a functional perspective on leadership, we develop a temporal account that links changes in task-, change-, and relations-oriented communication to emergent leadership in early, middle, and late team phases. We test the hypothesized relationships in 42 teams that provided round-robin emergent leadership ratings and videotapes of their first, midterm, and final meetings. Team members’ verbal behaviors were captured using fine-grained empirical interaction coding. Multilevel modeling showed that task-oriented communication was a stable positive predictor of emergent leadership at all time points. Change-oriented communication predicted emergent leadership at the start of a project and diminished in relevance at the midterm and final meetings. Relations-oriented communication gained importance, such that an increase in relations-oriented behaviors toward the project end predicted emergent leadership. We discuss theoretical implications for conceptualizing the behavioral antecedents of emergent leadership from a time- and context-sensitive perspective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)717-738
Number of pages22
JournalAcademy of Management Journal
Volume62
Issue number3
Early online date14 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

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It’s not just what is said, but when it’s said : A temporal account of verbal behaviors and emergent leadership in self-managed teams. / Gerpott, Fabiola H.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Voelpel, Sven C.; Van Vugt, Mark.

In: Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 62, No. 3, 06.2019, p. 717-738.

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

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