Keeping secrets from parents: Longitudinal associations of secrecy in adolescence

T. Frijns, C. Finkenauer, A.A. Vermulst, R.C.M.E. Engels

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    A 2-wave survey study among 1173 10-14-year-olds tested the longitudinal contribution of secrecy from parents to psychosocial and behavioral problems in adolescence. Additionally, it investigated a hypothesized contribution of secrecy from parents to adolescent development by examining its relation with self-control. Results showed that keeping secrets from parents is associated with substantial psychosocial and behavioral disadvantages in adolescence even after controlling for possible confounding variables, including communication with parents, trust in parents, and perceived parental supportiveness. Contrary to prediction, secrecy was also negatively associated with feelings of self-control. Secrecy from parents thus appears to be an important risk factor for adolescent psychosocial well-being and behavioral adjustment. © 2005 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)137-148
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
    Volume34
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    Confidentiality
    secrecy
    adolescence
    parents
    Parents
    self-control
    adolescent
    Adolescent Development
    Social Adjustment
    Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
    Child Welfare
    Emotions
    well-being
    Communication
    communication
    science

    Cite this

    Frijns, T. ; Finkenauer, C. ; Vermulst, A.A. ; Engels, R.C.M.E. / Keeping secrets from parents: Longitudinal associations of secrecy in adolescence. In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence. 2005 ; Vol. 34. pp. 137-148.
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    Keeping secrets from parents: Longitudinal associations of secrecy in adolescence. / Frijns, T.; Finkenauer, C.; Vermulst, A.A.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 34, 2005, p. 137-148.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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